NCRA member and firm CEO Deborah Weaver to be honored for Excellence in Legal Innovation

Debbie Weaver, owner and CEO of Alaris Litigation Services based in St. Louis, Mo., will be honored at the Missouri Lawyers Media inaugural Top Legal Innovation Awards for the creation of Alaris Online Litigation. The award is in the New Services or Products category, which recognizes innovative and high-utility tools that assist the work of an attorney.

Read more.

Retired NCRA member inducted into local Hall of Honor

Retired NCRA member Gerald Wilkinson, Kennett, Mo., was recently inducted into the Dunklin County Hall of Honor, according to an article posted Nov. 6 by the Delta Dunklin Democrat. Wilkinson, who is 90, was also an active member of the Missouri Court Reporters Association.

Read more.

NCRA Board Member participates in elementary school mock trial

NCRA Board Member Cindy L. Isaacsen, RPR, an official court reporter from Olathe, Kan., participated in a mock trial with fifth- and sixth-graders hosted on Oct. 10, by the Santa Fe Trail Elementary School in Shawnee Mission, Kan. The students sat with Johnson County judges, attorneys, a deputy court administrator, and Isaacsen, who helped the students determine if Goldilocks, from “Goldilocks and the Three Bears,” was guilty of a crime. These professionals visited the school to talk to students about the Constitution and branches of government.

Read more.

Watch the video.

NCRA contests draw attention to court reporting, captioning professions

Sherry Bryant and Mark Kislingbury

New Orleans media outlets interviewed several NCRA members who competed in the NCRA Speed Contest and NCRA Realtime Contest during the NCRA Convention & Expo held there earlier this month.

NCRA member and Guinness world record holder Mark Kislingbury, FAPR, RDR, CRR, from Houston, Texas, was featured in a segment on ABC affiliate WGNO that aired Aug. 8. The interview took place during NCRA’s 2018 Convention & Expo held in New Orleans Aug. 2-5, where Kislingbury won the National Realtime Contest.

Erminia Uviedo and Donna Karoscik

NCRA members Erminia Uviedo, RDR, CRR, CRC, and Donna Karoscik, RDR, CRR, CRC, were interviewed by New Orleans station WWLTV Channel 4 about the court reporting and captioning professions and what it’s like to compete in the National Realtime Contest.

Local court reporter earns national certification

Shoreline Area News posted a press a release on June 30 announcing that NCRA member Douglas Armstrong earned his RPR. The press release was issued by NCRA on Armstrong’s behalf.

Read more.

Winnebago County looks to recruit more court reporters to the court system

NCRA member Joan McQuinn, RPR, CMRS, an official court reporter from Rockford, Ill., talks about her career and the shortage of students entering the profession in an article posted June 12 by WREX Channel 13. McQuinn also serves as co-chair of NCRA’s Contests Committee.

Read more.

Steno on the go!

What’s the strangest place you’ve had to tap-tap-tap away on your little machine, knowing that people are relying on your speech-to-text output? A bus perhaps? No? Well, Michelle Coffey, RPR, CRI, CPE, has done just that, and she shared her story with the British Institute of Verbatim Reporters. Coffey owns Premier Captioning & Realtime Ltd in Wicklow, Ireland, and is a seasoned reporter. To know what it was like to caption on a moving bus, read her story below. Sounds like a whole heap of fun!


By Michelle Coffey

We all know that every day in the working life of a captioner is different and can be a challenge, and then there are days like Tuesday, November 26! It began like any other day, with a booking for a regular client at a conference they were holding to discuss accessible tourism in Ireland.

But then I was told we wouldn’t be needed till after lunch as the morning was being spent on an ‘accessible bus tour’ to some of the accessible sights of Dublin. Hold on a minute, though. If I’m there for access for the deaf/hoh tourists and I’m not needed, then how accessible is this tour going to be for them? So I asked how they’d feel if we tried to make the tour bus accessible. Without hesitation, we got a resounding yes! If you can do it, the organizers said, let’s go!

On the morning of the job, I arrived at their office with laptops, screens, projectors, extension cables, etc. I could see the perplexed expressions as they tried to work out how best to break it to me that I wouldn’t be able to plug in my extension lead on the bus or indeed my projector! But once I reassured them that I did really have some clue about what we were about to embark on and that the screens were for our final destination, everyone relaxed.

And I have to say, it was by far the most fun job I’ve done.

Three double-decker Dublin Buses pulled up outside the office, where everyone was given a name tag and allocated a bus. The idea was that as the buses traveled between destinations, the facilitator would lead discussion and debate onboard; and then in the afternoon all three busloads would feed back their information to the group at large. As our bus was now equipped with live speech to text, the occupants of the other buses could see what we were discussing or joking about! The tour very quickly descended into a school tour mentality (we were even given some snacks) with lots of good-natured joking, and one of our blind facilitators even scolded me for shielding my screen from him which meant neither he (nor Cookie his guide dog) could copy my answers to the quiz.

It soon became apparent that our driver was quite new to the concept of braking in a timely fashion and had probably never passed a pothole he didn’t enter! This being the case, I was finding it increasingly difficult to stay upright myself, much less my machine; with that in mind, the guys and gals on our bus decided to take bets on when the next bump in the road, traffic light, or such thing would cause me and/or my machine to slip! It really lightened the mood, everyone had a laugh, and it brought home to people in a very real and tangible way that accessibility for everyone is not just a soapbox topic. In fact, it became something that everyone on our bus played an active part in (even if some of them were “accidentally” bumping into me to get an untranslated word — and a laugh).

But it showed that access matters, and that it should matter to us all!

What I didn’t know before that morning was that not only were we doing a tour on the bus, but we also had two stops; one at a brand-new and very accessible hotel and one at a greyhound race track. Initially, it was suggested that I would stay on the bus and not transcribe the tours, but where’s the fun in that? And more importantly, where’s the accessibility in that? So, I picked up my steno machine, laid it against my shoulder like a carrying hod, and off I trooped to join the fun once more.

Once we got off the bus, the bets turned to how many different positions they could get me to write in; standing (we weren’t in the lobby of the hotel long enough to procure a chair); sitting (in the bar I managed to find a stool); balancing on a bed (with a busload of people crammed into even the most luxurious of hotel rooms, it tends to get a little cramped; never before had I cause to utter the sentence “Any chance a few of you guys could move over a little, I’m nearly falling off the bed!”); squatting (trackside at a greyhound racing park); machine stand on a bar table (at the betting counters in the racing park), and finally, my machine held by another tour member in the lift — it was a truly interactive tour.

And to finish the day off, we went back to the Guinness Storehouse for our panel discussion and debate about accessible tourism in Ireland (and free pints of Guinness, of course). All in all, a brilliant day. An important topic discussed, debated, delivered, and demonstrated in our different locations — the best job ever.

 

Casting call for stenographer

On June 6, Fox Channel 5 Good Day Atlanta posted a casting call for a stenographer for a film entitled Mule, being directed by Clint Eastwood.

Read more.

Stephen King’s ‘Mr. Mercedes’ seeks stenographer for finale episode

The final episode of Stephen King’s Mr. Mercedes is being filmed at the Manning Courthouse in Manning, S.C., according to an article posted June 8 by the postandcourier.com, and the production company is seeking a stenographer with their machine as an extra.

Read more.

NCRA member Penny Wile profiled in business news

NCRA member Penny Wile, RMR, CRR, Norfolk, Va., owner of Penny Wile Court Reporting, was profiled in an article posted May 21 by Inside Business, The Hampton Roads Business Journal. The article was generated by a press release issued by NCRA about Wile being featured in the May issue of the JCR.

Read more.