2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week celebrated in the media and on social media

Mississippi court reporters at the Capitol

Social media shares, careers showcased in the press, official proclamations, memes, open houses, and more have marked NCRA’s seventh Court Reporting & Captioning Week celebration happening Feb. 9–16. The weeklong event is designed to help promote the court reporting and captioning professions to the public by hosting demonstrations, open houses, and more.

At the national level, U.S. Rep. John Shimkus from Illinois recognized the week in a written speech submitted for the official record of the U.S. House of Representatives. In addition, U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis from Iowa delivered a similar speech from the House floor on Feb. 14, recognizing the event.

On Feb. 12, NCRA President Sue A. Terry, FAPR, RPR, CRR, CRC, participated in “Spread the Word,” an online event hosted by the College of Court Reporting in Valparaiso, Ind., in honor of 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week. Terry joined other representatives from the court reporting and captioning professions to talk to students firsthand about the benefits of a career in court reporting or captioning. The speakers also provided motivation and inspiration to those who attended and participated in a Q&A segment.

“It was a fantastic event for the attendees,” said Terry.  “Watching the chat window, you could tell they appreciated the information and were inspired by the many presenters. The presenters were given the opportunity to craft their own messages and topics. This was a great idea because you could tell each participant was speaking from their heart. It was an honor to join this group of dedicated professionals in giving back and motivating the next generation of reporters,” she added.

Social media has been abuzz

From Magnolia Reporting

State associations, individuals, and students have also taken to social media outlets to celebrate the week. In addition to sharing memes, professionals have also been sharing why they love their careers, information about special events happening in their areas, and more.

The celebration even generated a tweet by Joe Fulton, an attorney and partner with Martineau King in Charlotte, N.C., who tweeted “In honor of Court Reporting and Captioning Week, I will be keeping my voice up and speaking a little slower than normal this week. I have no idea how these people keep up! My best guess is magic.”

The Deposition Reporters Association of California shared via email with members a video of a keynote speech delivered by its lobbyist and attorney, Ed Howard, at its 2017 annual convention, where he told reporters why they are amazing.

In honor of the week, NCRA also launched a series of videos featuring members talking about why they love their careers. The videos are available on NCRA’s YouTube channel. State associations, members, and schools are encouraged to share them to help promote the court reporting and captioning professions all year round.

More schools joined in the fun

The Captioning and Court Reporting program at Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C), Cuyahoga, Ohio, held its annual write-a-thon fundraiser in celebration of the week. Students in the program gathered in a prominent area of the school plaza and worked together on their machines as a visible display of the court reporting profession in training. Students secured sponsors ahead of time to contribute funds to support student members attending professional development activities such as state and national conventions. In addition, Tri-C students in the program hosted a “Professional Pop-Up” interactive career event, which featured professional reporters from a variety of court reporting and captioning sectors who displayed their skills through demonstrations of live reporting and captioning. The event was followed by a Q&A session.

Court reporting and captioning students at Madison College, Madison, Wis., manned a two-day table in the school’s cafeteria where they practiced writing on their machines and talking with visitors to the table. In addition to the students, instructors were also on hand to talk about the career and the many opportunities available for those who choose it.

Official proclamations from Pennsylvania and San Antonio, Texas, were also reported later in the week bringing the total number of proclamations to 16.

And, as always, there has been media coverage

National Court Reporting & Captioning Week Showcased on Local Station

On Feb. 9, KIIITV, Corpus Christi, Texas, aired a story that featured faculty and students from the Del Mar College’s court reporting program showcasing the court reporting and captioning professions.

Watch the story.

Court Reporting & Captioning Week in Iowa

The Newton Daily News reported on Feb. 12 that a number of NCRA members from Iowa and faculty from the Des Moines Area Community College successfully secured an official proclamation by state Gov. Kim Reynolds recognizing 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week.

Read more.

Local court reporters recognized

On Feb. 11, channel KSAT, San Antonio, Texas, aired a story that recognized court reporters for their work. The story included an interview with NCRA member Carol Castillo, an official court reporter, from the steps of the Bexar County Courthouse in honor of 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week.

Read more.

An Interview with Kaylee Lachmann, RPR

NCRA member Kaylee Lachmann, RPR, a new court reporter with Planet Depos, was profiled in a blog posted by JD Supra on Feb. 13.

Read more.

Don’t forget to enter into this year’s drawings: Deadline to enter for both is Feb. 18

The NCSA State Challenge is a friendly contest among state associations and individual NCRA members to spread the word about the benefits of a career in court reporting or captioning. The 2019 NCSA State Challenge marks the fifth year the gauntlet has been thrown down. Winners will receive a variety of prizes ranging from complimentary NCRA event registrations to vouchers for continuing education.

This year, NCRA has issued its own challenge as well: It calls on all state affiliates to help celebrate this year’s Court Reporting & Captioning Week by securing an official proclamation recognizing the week by their state governor or a state lawmaker. States that submit a copy of their official state proclamation to pr@ncra.org will be entered into a drawing to win one free 2019 Convention & Expo registration.

A downloadable sample proclamation is available on NCRA’s Court Reporting & Captioning resource page.

For additional resources, visit NCRA’s Court Reporting & Captioning Week resources page at NCRA.org/home/events. No matter how you celebrate 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week, be sure to share your stories and photos with NCRA’s Communications Team at pr@ncra.org.

Read more about what others are doing to celebrate NCRA’s 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week.

Survey says: NCRA 2019 Business Summit inspiring and awesome

Jackie  Burrell, Fort Myers, Fla., Christine Bradshaw, Ocala, Fla., Debbie Dibble, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Dave Wenhold, NCRA Interim Executive Director & CEO at the 2019 Business Summit.

NCRA’s 2019 Business Summit held Feb. 1-3 in San Diego, Calif., attracted more than 170 attendees representing firms of all sizes from across the country and abroad and, as promised, delivered cutting-edge content and valuable takeaways for everyone.

Formerly called the NCRA Firm Owners Executive Conference, this year’s event was positioned to provide new and inspiring sessions designed to deliver the latest in business trends for success.

“The NCRA Business Summit set the stage for an exceptional year ahead!” wrote one attendee in a follow-up survey. “The integration of knowledge, support, and connection was awesome! An investment that will continue to pay dividends in the foreseeable future. Thank you, NCRA.”

Dr. Wendy Patrick leads a session on
“How to Effectively Communicate with Difficult People.”

Highlights of the 2019 Business Summit included ample networking opportunities, a discussion about trends in the industry by a panel of experts, a lesson on how to use storytelling as an influencer, and a keynote session focused on how simple shifts in everyday routines and mindsets can have a positive impact on leadership.

Other sessions included a look at the importance of community engagement and how to deal with difficult people. In addition, attendees watched a special Veterans History Project live interview that captured the story of Rear Adm. Ronne Froman, USN (Ret.) Froman served 31 years in the U.S. Navy and was the first woman to serve as commander of the U.S. Navy Region Southwest, responsible for nearly 90 Navy stations and bases around the world with a $7 billion budget.

The VHP panel included videographer Jennifer Eastman, San Diego, Calif., Jan Ballman, Minneapolis, Minn., Rosalie Kramm, San Diego, Calif., Rear Adm. Ronne Froman, and court reporter Tricia Rosate, San Diego, Calif.

“This year’s event inspired me to continue my leadership training through education,” said Jeri Kusar, RPR, CEO of Kusar Legal Service in Los Angeles, Calif. “It confirmed that my company was on the right path. I left renewed and regenerated with a clearer vision for the future.”

NCRA member Cheryl Mangio, RMR, CRR, CMRA, a freelance court reporter and agency owner from Seattle, Wash., said she found the session “Tough Love Part 2extremely valuable. It was led by past NCRA Director Mike Miller, FAPR, RDR, CRR, a freelance court reporter from Houston, Texas.

“I was really interested in Mike Miller’s talk because he is credible, and he didn’t hold back,” said Mangio. “I knew he would tell it like he sees it. It was awesome! In my opinion, he was right on. Overall, things are changing, and we need to evolve and adapt.”

2019 Business Summit opening reception

“I have always attended [the] Firm Owner’s [conference] and so naturally wanted to attend the Business Summit – I always learn so much and love seeing all of my colleagues who are so dear to me. If you want to feel the pulse of the industry and learn from other firm owners and leaders, you need to attend conferences with like-minded individuals,” she added.

Local court reporters recognized

On Feb. 11, channel KSAT, San Antonio, Texas, aired a story that includes an interview with NCRA member Carol Castillo at the steps of the Bexar County Courthouse. Castillo is an official court reporter who spoke about court reporters being recognized in honor of 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week.  

Read more.

Court Reporting and Captioning Week in Iowa

The Newton Daily News reported on Feb. 12 that a number of NCRA members from Iowa and faculty from the Des Moines Area Community College successfully secured an official proclamation by state Gov. Kim Reynolds recognizing 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week.

Read more.

How an “Evil Zombie Vampire Court Reporter from Hell” figures prominently in NCRA’s Court Reporting & Captioning Week

Maxyne Bursky

By Maxyne Bursky

NCRA’s 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week is a great impetus for veteran reporters to head into reporting schools and give both students and newbies a taste of what successful and amazing careers lie ahead of them. As experienced professionals, we have the privilege and advantage (and obligation, I would offer) of being able not only to show them a living, breathing sample of what’s possible, but also to give them a leg up on the mistakes, errors, or omissions (yes, omissions) we have made and bring this whole industry into perspective for a new generation of verbatim reporters. We are the face of the past and present, and they are our future.

On Feb. 9, I, along with my husband, Richard, a reporter of nearly 45 years, was honored to present a film I wrote and produced called “Evil Zombie Vampire Court Reporter from Hell” to students at Brown College of Court Reporting in Atlanta, Ga. The film is a 43-minute spoof of a deposition in which the star commits 47 professional infractions, any one of which could have gotten her dismissed from her job and many of which could have potentially ended her career.

Just to give you a little taste, the court reporter is 15 minutes late to the deposition, and she offers no apology or excuse. In fact, within the first five minutes, her actions clearly point to the fact that the attorneys in the film are in for a very, very long day.

Every time over the past five years that I have presented this film — as well as its sequel, “Evil Zombie Vampire Lawyer from Hell” — I watch it from beginning to end along with the attendees. I never tire of hearing students and veteran reporters alike gasp and giggle at the evil reporter’s bad behavior. It heartens me to know that the principles of preparedness, professionalism, and propriety, not to mention common sense, are ingrained in the majority of court reporters.

Even so, there are those who have come up to me at the conclusion of my lecture at a reporting school or even at a state convention and complained that the film is misguided in that, for example, not being prepared with exhibit stickers, extension cords, and the like is not so bad, or showing up 15 minutes before the start of a proceeding is acceptable. I typically arrive 45 minutes to an hour early, and when a student is shadowing me, I require them to meet me 60 minutes before the scheduled time so that we can chat about what is going to transpire once we are on the record.  My usual response to these naysayers is, “Well, you keep doing that, and next time those clients will call me, not you.”

Each person who watches the film receives a list of those 47 sins that evil reporter has committed, and I encourage everyone to hold off looking at the list and write on a separate piece of paper the number of bad behaviors they observed and then compare that list to the distributed material. I am so pleased to say, when we got to the lecture portion of the session at Brown College, the students were able to volunteer more than half of the unprofessional antics demonstrated in the film.

Brown College requires my book Talk to the Hands, a practical guide for the newbie, to be used by students in their career development class, which is one of the courses offered just prior to graduation. At each film presentation, I supply a workbook for that book, along with exemplars of cover, appearance, and certificate pages, among others, for students to use as a template when first entering into the court reporting workforce.

As a proud participant in NCRA’s online mentoring program, before I get off the phone with a dedicated court reporting student who’s stuck at 150 wpm or who has just emerged from theory and is feeling overwhelmed, I make sure that they know I went through the same angst, managed to get through it, and love (nearly) every minute of my workday.  And the paychecks aren’t bad either!

Because our profession has expanded so rapidly through technology, one of my mantras at every “evil” film presentation, on every mentoring phone call, at every meet and greet for new students, is realtime, realtime, realtime. That skill is what separates the proverbial men from the boys and expands our opportunities for personal and professional growth. In fact, the “evil reporter” is vehement in refusing to provide realtime to the movie’s attorneys.  In my early days of doing realtime, I felt as if I were sitting in the conference room in my dirty pajamas, and everyone present could plainly see how incompetent I was because of a misstroke here and there. I’m not afraid to share this and other similar observations with newbies, to let them know that with time and experience and a commitment to attaining higher speed through practice even after graduation, these insecurities will fade and be replaced with a satisfaction and acknowledgement of one’s own competence that will give rise to that new generation of professional court reporters.

Maxyne Bursky, RPR, CRR, CRC, is a freelance court reporter from McDonough, Ga. She can be reached at bullymax1@aol.com.

2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week is happening nationwide

NCRA’s weeklong National Court Reporting & Captioning Week kicked off Feb. 9 with state associations, schools, and firms sharing how they are celebrating the week. This is the seventh year NCRA has hosted the event designed to help promote the court reporting and captioning professions to the public by hosting demonstrations, open houses, and more.

At the national level, U.S. Rep. John Shimkus from Illinois recognized the week in a written speech submitted to the U.S. House of Representatives’ official record. In addition, U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis from Iowa is expected to deliver a similar speech from the House floor later in the week recognizing the event.

Arizona

Official proclamations have also been secured in the following states:

Arizona

California

Idaho

Illinois

Iowa

Mississippi

North Carolina

Ohio

Oklahoma

Iowa

Eugene, Ore.

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Wisconsin

What the states are up to

The California Court Reporters Association (CCRA) is hosting several events throughout the week for its members including a “Spread the Love” submission contest via its Facebook and Instagram outlets with a prize of a one-year association membership. CCRA members are also encouraged to share their steno talent at a career fair or volunteer to mentor a court reporting student to mark the week. Throughout the week CCRA will also dedicate one day each of social media posts to highlight members who are official court reporters, captioners, and freelancers. The freelancers’ day will also feature a digital “mixer” via Facebook where freelancers can connect and chat. CCRA is also auctioning off a new ProCat writer on its Facebook page and is hosting a live broadcast about NCRA’s A to ZTM Intro to Steno Machine Shorthand program.

“Court Reporters, the Eighth Wonder of the World,” is a poster the Florida Court Reporters Association has developed for its members to display in their courthouses and offices. The poster provides information about broadcast captioners, CART providers, realtime captioning, and court reporters.


President of the Kansas Court Reporters Association (KCRA) Jennifer Olsen, RPR, CRI, an official court reporter from Topeka, and other association members marked Court Reporting & Captioning Week with a presentation to local county commissioners in Shawnee County in Topeka. KCRA members will also be handing out information and treats all week to attorneys, judges, court staff, administration staff, and building staff in at their courthouse.

In Iowa, members of the Iowa Court Reporters tagged NCRA in one of their Facebook posts, and to date it has reached more than 22,500 people and generated more than 3,500 engagements and 220 shares. In addition, members are posting daily photos of their board members in super hero apparel and encouraging others to share photos of themselves with their machines either with or without super apparel.

President of the Ohio Court Reporters Association (OCRA) Terri Sims, RDR, CRR, an official court reporter from Clinton, Ohio, submitted a letter to the editor to all major newspapers in the state about the important work court reporters and captioners provide. In addition, OCRA members are being invited to participate in a Sip & Paint social event being held on Feb. 17.

In Oklahoma, members of the Oklahoma Court Reporters Association are hosting “A Day at the Capitol” for legislators that will include live demonstrations by court reporters and captioners as well as speakers.

Schools the celebration

Anoka Technical College in Anoka, Minn., is hosting an on-campus Court Reporting & Captioning Exhibition in conjunction with the Minnesota Association of Verbatim Reporters & Captioners. The event will feature demonstrations of state-of-the-art technology, tours of the school’s captioning lab, and short presentations. In addition, industry leaders representing realtime captioners and court reporters will also be on hand for the festivities. There will also be pizza, steno cake, coffee, soda, and prizes.

Faculty from the court reporting and captioning program at Green River College in Auburn, Wash.,  have tasked students with going out into the community and setting up their machines, practicing, and taking photos to try to spread the word about how great a career in court reporting or captioning is. Students will also be armed with information and be posting on social media throughout the week. In addition, one student will be traveling to Italy with her machine and will provide pictures. The photos will then be collected and used for a calendar. To further help students celebrate the week, Byers & Anderson, a court reporting firm in Tacoma, will be hosting a tour of its facilities and host a brunch and a Q & A session with working professionals.

Firms are celebrating too

AB Court Reporting & Video in Denver, Colo., branded a flyer designed by NCRA to help promote the week and the important work that court reporters and captioners do that the firm will share on its social media outlets throughout the week.

For the second consecutive year, Planet Institute, a division of Planet Depos, based in Washington, D.C., is offering three $1,000 scholarship opportunities to qualified students and recent graduates of the nation’s court reporting schools. Those who qualify to apply for one of three $1,000 scholarships are, specifically, students near completion of the program or who completed a court reporting program within the past three months.

And don’t forget the prizes

The NCSA State Challenge is a friendly contest among state associations and individual NCRA members to spread the word about the benefits of a career in court reporting or captioning. The 2019 NCSA State Challenge marks the fifth year the gauntlet has been thrown down. Winners will receive a variety of prizes ranging from complimentary NCRA event registrations to vouchers for continuing education.

This year, NCRA has issued its own challenge as well that calls on all state affiliates to help celebrate this year’s Court Reporting & Captioning Week by securing an official proclamation recognizing the week by their state governor or a state lawmaker. States that submit a copy of their official state proclamation to pr@ncra.org will be entered into a drawing to win one free 2019 Convention & Expo registration.

A downloadable sample proclamation is available on NCRA’s Court Reporting & Captioning resource page.

For additional resources, visit NCRA’s Court Reporting & Captioning Week resources page. No matter how you celebrate 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week, be sure to share your stories and photos with NCRA’s Communications Team at pr@ncra.org.

Read more about what others are doing to celebrate NCRA’s 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week.

Nominations open for awards and scholarships, including the all-new NCRA A to Z scholarships

It’s time to recognize someone special! Every year, NCRA offers members several scholarships and awards to bring attention to the people who are contributing to the profession in important ways. In addition to the annual scholarships managed by the Council on Approved Student Education (CASE), the National Court Reporters Foundation has initiated an all-new scholarship to help students who have completed the NCRA A to Z™ Intro to Machine Shorthand program with the next step in their training. Scholarships are supported by funds from the National Court Reporters Foundation (NCRF).

Nominations are now open, so consider nominating individuals for these special opportunities:

CASE scholarships.Five scholarships are available. Students attending an NCRA-approved court reporting program and writing between 140 and 180 wpm are encouraged to apply for this scholarship. Teachers and mentors, let them know that you see their potential. The nomination period opens Feb. 15 and nominations close April 1.  

NCRA A to Z ™ scholarships. Up to 10 students will receive a $500 scholarship. Qualified applicants must have completed the NCRA A to Z™ Intro to Steno Machine Shorthand program as well as pass a skills test writing between 60 and 100 wpm, among other eligibility requirements. Nominations open Feb. 15 and close April 1.

 CASE Educator of the Year. This special award is for a court reporting instructor. Was there someone special who inspired you, who got you through the ups, downs, and plateaus of your court reporting classes? If your teacher was an incredible influence in you getting started, now is the time to say thank you by nominating that special someone for the CASE Educator of the Year Award. Nominations open Feb. 15 and close April 1.

Fellow of the Academy of Professional Reporters. If you know a dedicated court reporter or captioner who has contributed to the profession in a big way over the years, nominate that person as a Fellow. Candidates must be active practitioners in the field and have at least 10 years of experience. Criteria for nomination include the publication of important papers, legislative or creative contributions to the field, and service on committees or boards. Nominations open Feb. 15 and close April 1.

National Court Reporting & Captioning Week Showcased on Local Station

On Feb. 9, KIII-TV, Corpus Christi, Texas, aired a story that featured faculty and students from the Del Mar College’s court reporting program showcasing the court reporting and captioning professions.

Watch the story.

Share these videos to promote the profession

“I can go to any city I want,” Isaiah Roberts

Just in time for 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning week, NCRA has  released a series of shareable videos that promote the profession from the perspectives of a variety of stenographers with different stories about how they got started, why they love what they do, and how the profession has enhanced their lives.

Share these videos on social media and email them to your friends to spread the word about the opportunities in this field. It’s a great thing to do this week or anytime you want to promote the profession.

Just in time for 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning week, we have new videos ready to share. You might have seen them on the NCRA Facebook page this week. The videos show NCRA members saying why they love what they do. They highlight the different reasons being a court reporter or captioner is a great career choice.

We urge you to share these videos on social media to spread the word about all the opportunity in our field. It’s a great thing to do this week or anytime you want to promote the profession.

The videos are:

Nothing can compare to this job with Pam and Danielle Griffin

I was so lucky to stumble upon this job with Nancy Hopp

It’s a career that I absolutely love with Charrise Kitt

Seated close to former President Obama with Steve Clark

You can grow this career to anything you need it to be with Merilee Johnson

I can go to any city I want with Isaiah Roberts

If you know people interested in taking the first steps to a career in court reporting or captioning, send them to ncra.org/discoversteno.

10 ways to celebrate Court Reporting & Captioning Week

NCRA’s 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week is here, and to help you celebrate, here is a list of ways you can participate in the week-long event taking place Feb. 9-16. This year marks the seventh year NCRA has hosted this national event, and everyone from students to working professionals to state associations to vendors is encouraged to take part in the celebration.

  1. Showcase the court reporting and captioning professions by taking part in a career day at a local middle or high school. One of the best ways to share what you do is to introduce students to your steno machine and let them know why the court reporting and captioning professions are so rewarding. Share your story about how you found the profession, some of the highlights of your career, and why stenography is so important in making and preserving the record. For more information about participating in a local career day, contact pr@ncra.org.
  2. Host a Veterans History Project at your local Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) hall or retirement community and give those who served our country the chance to share their stories of service for preservation at the Library of Congress. For more information on hosting a VHP event, contact sdavoren@ncra.org.
  3. Visit a local court reporting school to meet with and inspire students by sharing your professional story, o­ffering encouragement, and tips for being successful both while in school and when they enter the working world.
  4. Sign up for NCRA’s Virtual Mentor Program. Virtual mentoring is a way for court reporting professionals and students to participate in a mentoring relationship in a virtual (i.e. remote) setting. Mentors and mentees are matched by NCRA’s Virtual Mentor Program and introduced via email. Most of our participants are not geographically close to each other and find it convenient to communicate via phone, email, or Skype. For more information, visit NCRA.org/VMP.
  5. Volunteer to lead an NCRA A to Z™ Intro to Steno Machine Shorthand program and introduce this profession to a whole new group of potential students. For more information, visit NCRA.org/DiscoverSteno.
  6. Send prewritten local media pitch and press releases to your local newspaper, radio station, and news station before, during, or after Court Reporting & Captioning Week. Templates and other resources can be found on the Court Reporting & Captioning Week resources page at NCRA.org/awareness.
  7. Share a complimentary copy of Making the Record: A Guide for Attorneys with all lawyers whom you work with during Court Reporting & Captioning Week.
  8. Post frequently on social media during Court Reporting & Captioning Week about why you became a court reporter, your favorite court reporting gadget, or what you like to tell nonreporters about the profession.
  9. Invite a student or students to shadow you for a day so they can experience first-hand what a day in the life of a working professional is like.
  10. Volunteer to caption a live event in your community such as a church service or local library program.

For additional resources, visit NCRA’s Court Reporting & Captioning Week resources page at NCRA.org/awareness. No matter how you celebrate 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week, be sure to share your stories and photos with NCRA’s Communications Team at pr@ncra.org.