Top reasons to visit Denver

NCRA’s 2019 Convention & Expo takes place in Denver, Colo., Aug. 15-18 at the Hyatt Regency Denver at Colorado Convention Center.
Denver, The Mile High City, is a vibrant outdoor city located at the base of the majestic Rocky Mountains. Brilliant blue skies and 300 days of sunshine inspire urban adventures for all ages so be sure to register to attend this year’s NCRA premier event.

Whether you’re a foodie, sports enthusiast, a history buff, an art lover, or an avid shopper, Denver will surprise you with everything it has to offer. While at NCRA’s convention, be sure to take time between networking and educational sessions to visit the walkable downtown.

“Within a short walk of the Hyatt Regency you’ll find plenty to do on the 16th Street Mall. Boasting 42 outdoor cafés, a multitude of shops, a bustling nightlife scene, and a free shuttle bus called MallRide, the mile-long outdoor promenade is a perfect venue for your convention extracurriculars,” said NCRA member and Denver resident Matthew Moss, RPR, an official court reporter with Colorado’s 2nd Judicial District.

Moss also recommends visitors to Denver make the 10-minute walk from the hotel to the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, the nation’s largest non-profit theatre organization. “On evening nights throughout the convention the DCPA is scheduled to host legendary improv comedy enterprise The Second City, as well as the Broadway musicals including Chicago and Anastasia,” he says.

Closer to the 15-minute walking range from the hotel, there’s History Colorado Center, an award-winning tourist destination and a hub for learning and entertainment. The area features the Molly Brown House Museum, home to the famed Titanic survivor, actress, philanthropist, and activist, and a portal to Victorian Denver, and the Ralph Carr Building, home of the Colorado Supreme Court and Court of Appeals as well as 11 major public art installations, Moss adds.

“If you’re up for exploring a little further from the hotel check out City Park, take a 10-minute Uber ride from the convention site to a sprawling public park in close proximity to the Museum of Nature and Science, the Denver Planetarium, and the Denver Zoo. Further out, yet worthy of your consideration, are Red Rocks, the best small outdoor venue in America, and the park that contains it, as well as the Coors Brewery in Golden, the largest single-site brewery in the world,” Moss says.

NCRA member Brandi L. Burnett, RPR, also a Denver resident and owner of Burnett & Neilson Professional Reporters, notes that foodies attending the convention will find no lack of wonderful restaurants offering an array of tastes. She especially recommends her favorites, Euclid Hall and the Root Down.

Burnett also recommends taking in a game to watch some Rockies baseball if there is a game happening during convention and checking out some of the many theaters Denver has to offer such as the Buell Theater where the Broadway play Wicked is currently being performed.

“Transportation downtown isn’t too bad. The 16th Street Mall has a free shuttle that spans all of 16th Street. There is also the Lyme type scooters available for rent as well as bike companies everywhere,” Burnett adds.

Below is a list of the top 10 reasons to visit Denver according to the city’s visitor’s bureau.

  1. Red Rocks Park & Amphitheatre

Red Rocks Park & Amphitheatre is famous for its one-of-a-kind outdoor concert venue that is surrounded by giant, ancient rock formations. During the day, Red Rocks is a free city park with easy hiking trails and a visitor center that includes a Performers’ Hall of Fame. Legendary musicians like The Beatles (1964) and U2 (1983) have performed here, and today, the summer concert series from May through October presents the best artists in jazz, rock, pop, bluegrass, and more. Seeing a concert under the stars is a magical experience. Red Rocks Park is located 30 minutes west of downtown Denver.

2. Denver Beer Trail

Take a self-guided tour along the Denver Beer Trail and sample the craft beer paradise in The Mile High City. Explore the featured breweries, most in the walkable downtown area, and you will find everything from stouts to lagers and all the flavors in between. Denver’s craft beer culture is thriving, creative and growing larger every day.

3. Rockmount Ranch Wear
A true Western icon, Jack A. Weil (1901-2008), invented the first cowboy shirt with snaps and helped popularize Western wear as legitimate American fashion. Many of the Rockmount designs are worn by movie stars and music legends, all with the signature design of diamond snaps and sawtooth pockets. The grandson of “Papa Jack” Weil, Steve Weil, continues the tradition today at the store located in the heart of downtown at 1626 Wazee St.

4. Denver Art Museum

See the famous collection of Native American art and explore the bold contemporary art inside and out of the new Frederic C. Hamilton building, designed by world famous architect Daniel Libeskind. Denver Art Museum, located in downtown’s Golden Triangle, also offers free general admission on the first Saturday of every month and is free for kids under 18 at all times. The Golden Triangle Creative District is also home to galleries, fine-art studios, specialty stores, and eight museums, including Clyfford Still Museum and the Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art.

5. Larimer Square

Larimer Square is Denver’s oldest and most historic block, home to the first saloons and businesses in The Mile High City. Today, the Victorian buildings have been transformed into shops, wine bars and the hottest, chef-owned restaurants. Look for the sparkling lights strung above the street, relax at an outdoor cafe or bar, taste the best of cuisine created by local chefs, or find unique clothing and accessories in the boutiques.

6. Union Station & LoDo (Lower Downtown)

Downtown Denver’s Union Station has undergone a massive restoration and redevelopment effort that transformed the landmark into a transportation, dining, shopping, and entertainment hub, all centered around the boutique Crawford Hotel. The station is a now a fun gathering place for locals and visitors eat a breakfast burrito at Snooze, sip a beer at the Terminal Bar, sample the locally sourced cuisine at one of the unique restaurants, shop a bit or have a hand-mixed cocktail at Cooper Lounge. There is direct rail service between Denver International Airport (DEN) and this landmark in the heart of downtown.

7. History Colorado Center

Denver’s History Colorado Center features exhibits and programs that tell the stories of Colorado and engage visitors in the past, present, and future of the Rocky Mountain West. Enjoy interactive exhibits like a virtual ride in a real Model T, test your skills on a ski-jump simulator or set off dynamite in an 1880s hard-rock mine.

8. B-cycle to Neighborhoods – RiNo, Art District on Santa Fe and More!

Vibrant arts and culture are just two wheels away! Explore The Mile High City using Denver B-cycle, Denver’s pioneering bike-sharing program and pedal your way through Denver’s creative art districts that surround the city center. Explore the River North Art District (RiNo), which is rapidly becoming the hotspot for artists, foodies, and designers. While retaining its industrial character, RiNo still offers plenty of cafés, brewpubs, restaurants, and art galleries. Visit the Highlands neighborhood, just north of downtown or the Art District on Santa Fe, which is home to more than 100 galleries, artist studios, and creative businesses. Denver’s art districts also celebrate the first Friday of each month with art walks where galleries are open late.

9. Cherry Creek

Cherry Creek Shopping Center is home to more than 160 stores and restaurants including Macy’s, Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, Abercrombie & Fitch, Levi’s, Michael Kors, and Hugo Boss. Visit the guest services desk and ask for your “Passport to Shopping,” which offers discounts for more than 60 stores and restaurants. Head across 1st Avenue to find the charming, tree-lined streets of the Cherry Creek North neighborhood. Here you can explore galleries, boutiques, restaurants, coffee shops, spas, and more. Cherry Creek is located just 15 minutes southeast of downtown.

10. Denver Attraction Passes

The Mile High City offers you two different passes to take advantage of the great attractions throughout the city. The Mile High Culture Pass gives you three days to explore many of Denver’s top art and cultural museums, while the Denver CityPASS gives you access to three, four, or five of Denver’s most popular attractions for seven days. Explore the two options at DenverAttractionPass.com.

Purpose of the bylaw change for the National Congress of State Associations

At the annual business meeting during the 2019 NCRA Convention & Expo in Denver, one of the proposed bylaw changes is being put forward by NCSA (National Committee of State Associations). The proposal will change the name of NCSA to the National Congress of State Associations and includes other bylaw changes affecting NCSA’s structure, changing it back to more of a legislative function within NCRA’s organizational structure, acting as a resolution-making body, forwarding said resolutions to the NCRA Board of Directors for review and/or vote on the issues brought forth.  As well, the Congress will serve as a potential proving ground for identification and development of future NCRA leaders and Board members based on demonstration of leadership ability and statesmanship.

The mission of the Congress will be to act as ambassadors from each state association affiliate back to NCRA on behalf of the court reporting and captioning communities and provide a forum for state leaders to exchange information on various issues and points of view involving the Association and the profession.  The overall hope for the new Congress will be to act as a partner with the Board, however, with all state affiliate delegate leaders working together as 50 state associations on issues facing our industry. They will develop ideas, solutions, and paths forward to be advanced to the Board with suggested changes and the thought process behind how those recommendations were reached, with the ultimate decision still resting with the NCRA Board of Directors. 

The Congress will provide a unique voice working in conjunction with the NCRA Board of Directors… working as a team developing our future together!

Bloomfield College announces certificate programs in court reporting

Bloomfield College, Bloomfield, N.J., announced on June 10 that it will begin offering two certificate programs in court reporting starting in the fall of 2019. Admission to the program is contingent upon successful completion of NCRA’s  A to ZTM Intro to Steno Machine Shorthand program.

Read more.

Court reporting: An under-marketed profession

JD Supra posted an updated blog on June 13 that reminds readers about the need for court reporters in the legal system and the need to promote the profession as a viable career.

Read more.

Shortfall leaves attorneys, court reporters in a lurch as Florida governor ponders budget

The Orlando Sentinel reported on June 13 that a $17 million shortfall at an agency that pays indigent criminal defendants for legal counsel means state vendors supplying court reporters, private investigators, and expert witnesses are going without pay for at least two months.

Read more.

Pennsylvania court reporter gets perfect score on an online skills test

Alison Moffett, Elizabethtown, Pa., recently scored a perfect score on the RPR literary skills test.

“Congratulations to Alison!” said Eva Liu, NCRA Certification and Testing Program Manager. “It’s extremely hard to match word for word on a test to get a perfect score, but it’s not impossible.”

JCR Weekly asked Moffett for more information about her perfect score.

JCR Weekly | When did you take the test?

Moffett | I took the test on April 30 around 7:30 in the morning. I had previously had problems with internet connectivity and losing my connection during the middle of the exam, so I wanted to take it at a time when less people would hopefully be using the internet.

 JCR Weekly | Are you working as a court reporter? Where? How long?

Moffett |Yes, I work as an official in the courthouse in York County, Pa., for just 3.5 years.

 JCR Weekly | Why did you decide to test for your RPR?

Moffett | We provide realtime for nearly all of the judges and occasionally some attorneys, and I would like to earn my CRR. Getting my RPR is the first step towards that goal!

 JCR Weekly | How did you prepare?

Moffett |I did the practice tests in Realtime Coach a couple times, but the most important thing was practicing the testing procedures so you aren’t overly anxious when it comes time to test.

 JCR Weekly | How did you think you did when you finished the test?

Moffett |I thought I did pretty well.

 JCR Weekly | How did you react when you got your score?

Moffett | I was excited but also had to leave to go to work, so I didn’t have much time to celebrate except for a quick call to my fiancé.

  JCR Weekly | How do you think having your RPR will help you?

 Moffett | It will allow me to get further certifications such as CRR or CRC  and open up other options for careers going forward!

  JCR Weekly | When do you plan on taking the next test?

 Moffett |After the wedding! In all seriousness, I plan on practicing over the summer and testing in the fall. The last leg I need is the Q&A.

My (not so secret) life as a weekend rock star

By Patricia Nilsen (with Kiki Kim)

Patricia Nilsen

As a lifelong fan of Mötley Crüe, the glam-metal band that became famous in the 1980s, my dream as a child was to someday meet the band. In the mid-2000s, an inspirational Mötley Crüe reunion show at Madison Square Garden in NYC gave me this wacky idea to start an all-girl Mötley Crüe tribute band. The fact that I played zero instruments seemed just a minor detail at the time. A friend of mine — blonde, like the Crüe’s lead singer — loved the idea and said she could sing. I thought: “Done, here we go!” And Girls Girls Girls was born. I asked my husband for a bass guitar for my 31st birthday, and he obliged with a shiny pink bass and the words he would probably one day come to regret: “You better actually play that thing.”

I was working as a full-time federal official in the Southern District of New York in Manhattan — a pretty busy gig, if you’re not familiar with it. Lacking the time for lessons to start with the fundamentals, I essentially learned online. I also couldn’t be bothered to learn how to use a pick — my fingers had always been fast on the machine, so I went with what I knew.

I had been noodling at home for a few months when I saw an ad for a ladies’ rock camp, which seemed like a good place to meet my future bandmates. Most importantly, I needed a guitarist that could really shred. Sadly, the guitarists at camp were more Jewel than Lita Ford. I did, however, meet a wannabe drummer who did finance by day and just came for fun: Kiki Kim. She and her friend invited me to ditch camp at lunch to get a beer – rock ’n’ roll already! Over drinks, I told her my idea, which she probably laughed off as a “Sure, I’ll join your (finger quotes) band.” We exchanged business cards, and that was likely the last she thought she’d ever hear from me.

To find the last piece of the puzzle, my graphic-artist husband photoshopped our faces over an iconic photo of Mötley Crüe with a blank over guitarist Mick Mars’ face and the words “YOUR FACE HERE.”I used the picture in an ad containing the same language Mars used for his own ad in search of the band that would eventually become Mötley Crüe: Seeking “loud, rude, and aggressive [fe-male] guitarist.” Months went by with no reply, and I was ready to hang it up when I finally got the call. Denise “D” Mercedes, who had played in a famous influential punk band called The Stimulators in the 1980s, hadn’t played in 20 years but loved our ad so much that she said: “I just gotta see who these chicks are!”
We were now a full band, and it was time to play. In contrast with my sweet and innocent idea of practicing in my city apartment, D, our lone professional musician, knew how to find rented rehearsal-studio space. And, boy, could she shred. My friend couldn’t sing over the loud guitar and was gone by morning. My finance-professional beginner drummer took one look/listen at D and wanted to follow suit. Fortunately, my powers of persuasion were as strong as my will to start this band, and I convinced her to stay at least temporarily (spoiler alert: she stayed for good). And now we were on the hunt for a new singer. The three of us continued rehearsing for months until we found one.

Our first gig was at a club in Jersey, where we played the owner’s birthday party. We hired a party bus to shuttle our friends from New York City for the show, and it was an incredible time! Little did I know that what seemed like the culmination of a dream was only just the beginning. Over the next two years, we played almost 50 shows. I spent two to three weekends a month in a van, visiting new cities, making new friends, and rocking my heart out.

I was living three distinct lives: Patricia, band manager and court reporter; Patty, wife, New Yorker; and Nikita Seis, Goddess of Bass. My life as a court reporter wasn’t much different except that I took more Fridays off and spent Monday watching the black nail polish slowly chip from my nails, in a daze, with a smile on my face and bags under my eyes. We had enough adventures to fill a book. Our rise was fast, as was our fall. The potent mix of four women with strong and distinct personalities led to a dramatic breakup.

During our time off, one member moved on to form a different band, and I had my first child. During maternity leave, I created a photo book of our time together as a band that made us nostalgic and drew us back together, supposedly with new insight into what went wrong and how to change it. Three years after our breakup, a reunion show was in the works, and I was newly pregnant with baby number two. Four months later, I squeezed into my stage clothes (with much lower heels!), and we packed Brooklyn Bowl with a crowd as eager for our return as we were. Everyone was flying high, so I found a replacement bassist and continued just managing the band from home. Now that I had more time, I was able to take the management role more seriously and brought us to new markets, better money, the cover of The Village Voice, and our first international tour in Mexico.
But two years later, the wheels fell off again, and the band broke up for all the same reasons and more. In total, we played exactly 100 shows in 16 states before I moved to Nashville, when I thought that chapter had finally ended. In December 2018, I was a freelance reporter who hadn’t played in three years. Thanks to maintaining our presence on social media, we had continued to receive inquiries from random clubs and people who wanted us to play their brother’s barbeque for chump change. But then I got the email: Netflix wanted us to play a private party in Hollywood for the premiere of the upcoming biopic about Mötley Crüe, The Dirt. It was contingent on all four members of Mötley Crüe signing off onus. Phone calls were made, singers auditioned, and the bass was officially out of the case. We landed the gig with about seven weeks to get our act together!

The film producers chose four songs and would decide if the crowd liked us enough for an encore — no pressure! Before the show, we were thrilled to hear that Mötley Crüe singer Vince Neil and drummer Tommy Lee were in the house. We hit the stage in front of a capacity crowd at the world-famous Whisky A Go Go and ripped into our namesake song, “Girls Girls Girls.” The energy was electric; it felt amazing. During our fourth song, “Kickstart My Heart,” Tommy Lee and the actor who played him in the movie came dancing down the stairs and made their way to the stage, leading to the cue to play our encore, “Live Wire.”

Watching the drummer who made this music famous air-drumming to my band was a moment I will never forget. After the show, Tommy told us our set was “dope,” and we all went home smiling from ear to ear. I share this story because it all began as a crazy idea I had. The most I imagined was playing a gig for our friends at a real New York City venue. Never in my wildest dreams did I think that I would create something bigger than myself, and that 13 years later, it would still be going. As court reporters, we tend to think that our job is our life and that we don’t have time for anything else. But one of the greatest benefits of this career is the flexibility, and we can do what we choose in our off-time. Choose big. Dream big. And don’t be surprised when your dreams come true.

Patricia Nilsen, RMR, CRR, CRC, is a freelance reporter with Alpha Reporting in Nashville, Tenn. She can be reached atpatricianilsen@alphareporting.com. For more on Girls Girls Girls, check out the band at www.girlsgirlsgirlsnyc.com and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/girlsgirlsgirlsnyc. Girls Girls Girls drummer Kiki Kim helped with this story.

Ask the Techie: CART captioning brief forms

Dear Techie,

I will be transitioning into CART captioning and need some great briefs. I’m hopeful someone on your Tech Committee can provide a few brief forms to get me started that I can add to my dictionary.

Captivated with Captioning

Dear Captivated,

Writing short is the way to go for every court reporter! We think you’ll love the following brief forms from some of the CART captioners on our Tech Committee. Good luck with your transition!

CART captioner and freelance court reporter Amy Yarbrough, Atlantic Beach, Fla., has the following brief forms she recommends and uses daily:

Briefs for words ending in -ly:

basically = B*L

exactly = KP*L

completely = KPH*L or KPH*T

previously: PRAO*EL

ultimately: U*LT

constantly: KA*UNL

really: R*EL

not really: N*EL

obviously: O*BL

absolutely: SLAOULT

Classroom parentheticals:

Phone/phone: <Parenthetical>(Cell phone interruption)

Span/Span: <Parenthetical>(Speaking Spanish)

Lang/Lang: <Parenthetical>(Speaking another language)

Check/check: (^^Captioner will verify spelling later^^)

PO*U/PO*U: <Parenthetical>(Reading from PowerPoint)

In small classes or club meetings, if you can learn names, use the first letter of the name plus the answer bank to define a person’s name. It is helpful to have an ID for yourself in case you need to write a message or respond to the professor. Additionally, have a generic stroke for guest speakers. 

A + Answer Bank: <Colloquy>>>AMY:

C + Answer Bank: <Colloquy>>>CAPTIONER:

G + Answer Bank: <Colloquy>>>GUEST SPEAKER:

Teresa Russ, CRI, Bellflower, Calif., another CART captioner and freelance court reporter on the Technology Committee, offered a few of her favorites to add to your list: 

finish – TPOEURB

homework – HOERBG

admonition – TPNEURB

coefficient – TPOERB

classroom –  KHRAOPL

Start earning the CRC in Denver

Register for the Certified Realtime Captioner (CRC) Workshop at NCRA’s 2019 Convention & Expo happening Aug. 15-18, in Denver, Colo., and start on becoming recognized as one of the most elite and qualified captioners in the profession. The CRC Workshop is being held on Thursday, Aug. 15, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and is chock-full of valuable information for understanding what it takes to be a captioner.

Candidates for the CRC must also:

  • Pass the CRC Skills Test (literary matter at 180 wpm) at 96 percent accuracy, which is offered online under NCRA’s new block schedule. Registration for the Skills Test will be open from Aug. 1-20, with testing available from Sept. 1-20.
  • Pass a 50-question CRC Written Knowledge Test (WKT).

The CRC certification also acknowledges proficiency in language skills and in realtime writing in the broadcast and CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) environments.

“Becoming a Certified Realtime Captioner will allow me to expand my professional reporting services to my clients and hone my skills in a challenging industry,” said Elia E. Carrión, RPR, an official court reporter for the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. Carrión has worked as a court reporter for 22 years. She earned her CRC in May.

More information about the CRC and other NCRA certifications is available online at NCRA.org/testing.

Get the edge by attending NCRA’s CRR Boot Camp

Professionals considering taking the Certified Realtime Reporter (CRR) test have the opportunity to gain an advantage by attending the CRR Boot Camp being offered at the 2019 NCRA Convention & Expo in Denver, Colo., being held Aug. 15-18.

NCRA’s CRR certification represents realtime pro­ficiency for those who earn it as it is recognized in the industry as the national certification of real­time competency. Holding the CRR also can lead to an increase in salary, as noted by a number of recent NCRA surveys.

“As the CRR Chief Examiner in Massachu­setts, I saw so many candidates come back time and time again to take the certification test. It was bittersweet. They couldn’t pass, but they kept trying,” said Kathryn Sweeney, FAPR, RMR, CRR, a freelance reporter and agency owner from Acton, Mass., who helped develop the boot camp pro­gram and who will be teaching it at the NCRA Convention & Expo.

“The idea of the boot camp came about when the Board of the Massachusetts Court Reporters Association (MCRA) approached me with ques­tions as to why there were not more people pass­ing the CRR exam and what I could do to maybe help those candidates,” said Sweeney, who also served as a beta tester for NCRA’s online testing system and as CRR Chief Examiner on behalf of the Association for 17 years.

“They gave me two hours and a place to give a seminar back in October of 2009. It was originally named ‘Ready? Begin.’ Those are the two most dreaded words for even the most skilled court reporter,” Sweeney said.

Because it was felt that the original name of the program might actually scare people away, it was renamed the CRR Dress Rehearsal. Over the years, however, said Sweeney, the presentation turned into a three-hour session and was appro­priately renamed again to the CRR Boot Camp.

Word about the program has been spreading across states, according to Sweeney, who has been presenting the session all across the country, with more state associations contacting her about presenting it at their meetings.

Unlike NCRA’s newest certification, the Certi­fied Realtime Captioner (CRC), which requires participation in a 10-hour workshop before being able to take the test, the CRR Boot Camp is not a prerequisite for taking the CRR test. However, said Sweeney, it can certainly help with increasing the chances of passing on the first take.

In the course, she explains to attendees the testing requirements, covers NCRA’s What is an Error?, discusses what is not an error, and talks about the online testing process. She also offers tips on working on self-preparation, includ­ing what to have on test day, what to do and not do on test day, and how and why candidates fail. Participants in the session are also asked to bring their equipment with them because Sweeney said she also lets them take a couple of practice tests, as well as manipulate the system settings and dictionary entries.

“There is so much material. Even if just one thing I teach resonates with an attendee, one thing that they can go back and fix or change, it may just be the one thing that pushes them over the hump and gets them that CRR desig­nation,” said Sweeney.

One reason she attributes the program’s success in helping CRR candidates be suc­cessful in passing the test is because much of the material she covers about being prepared includes information often missed, such has having flash drives or SD cards properly for­matted, which is included in the recommended reading on the testing website and contained in the pre-test emails they receive.

“The most frustrating part of being the proc­tor at brick-and-mortar testing sites was that I could not help the candidates. It was simply not allowed. They were supposed to just know all this stuff. Heck, candidates showed up without their driver’s license because they didn’t know they needed to show it to me,” she said.

“I strongly believe taking the CRR Boot Camp will increase the chance of passing this test. When I finished my presentation in Geor­gia, a woman who already had her CRR came up to me and said that she wished this seminar was around when she was preparing for the test; that it had all of the information and steps that she muddled through on her own. She said it took years of figuring out what was being asked of her and then changing her writing and learning her equipment and software in order to pass,” Sweeney said. “With this boot camp, I can help you in three hours.”

Perhaps the greatest benefit of taking the CRR Boot Camp is that attendees will know if they’re ready to take the test or not, while those who have taken the test before will realize why they didn’t pass, she noted.

“I am a huge proponent of not throwing money away. If you’re not quite ‘there’ yet, then don’t spend (the money) on this test. You will learn what you need to work on before you take the plunge and sign up for the test. You will know when you’re ready, instead of just winging it and hoping for the best,” Sweeney added. “The CRR really is the easiest test you’ll ever fail. But why fail at all? Learn what you need to do in order to pass. Come to my boot camp!”

Sweeney, who has been a court reporter for 28 years, served eight years on her state association’s Board of Directors, two years as president, and recently joined as a director again in April.

To earn the CRR certification, professionals are required to hold the Registered Profes­sional Reporter (RPR) certification, be a current member of NCRA, and pass a realtime testi­mony skills test at 200 words per minute with 96 percent accuracy.

For more information about or to register for NCRA’s CRR Boot Camp and the 2019 Convention & Expo, visit NCRA.org/events.