Everything you need to show lawyers how to make a better record

If you’ve had clients who won’t slow down, speak up, or educate the witness on how to make a good record and you wished you had something handy to share with them, look no further than the Legal Education Program seminar, “Making the Record,” provided by the National Court Reporters Foundation.

NCRF’s Legal Education Program has received high praise from court reporters, and it offers several resources for you to choose from.

The program booklet can be distributed as needed, while the presentation tools have been created so you can educate law students, young attorneys, and judges about the importance of making a good record in a group setting.

  • Making the Record – This booklet was designed to help members of the bench and bar understand the factors that assist in making a clear record.
  • Presentation tools – When you offer to present the Legal Education Seminar to groups, you have at your disposal an outline, PowerPoint slide set, and handouts. Seminar tools are provided to court reporters for free and are fully customizable for specific audiences and your personal message.

Need more motivation? You can earn Professional Development Credits (PDCs) toward your overall CEU requirements by giving a Legal Ed presentation! Learn more.

Access the full Legal Education Program now.

Learn more about other programs provided by the National Court Reporters Foundation at NCRA.org/Foundation.

Local bar association offers new attorneys advice about ensuring an accurate record

JCR: Journal of Court Reporting, TheJCR.com, JCR WeeklyAn event hosted by the local bar association in Jacksonville, Fla., advised about 50 young attorneys on rookie mistakes to avoid as they begin their careers, according to an article posted Nov. 15 by the Jax Daily Record. Among the pieces of advice given included: “Address the court, not opposing counsel, and refrain from talking when someone else is speaking because that makes it difficult for the stenographer to accurately record the proceedings.”

Read more.








Green River Community College students participate in mock depositions

JCR logoIn January, Lori Rapozo, RPR, CRI, an instructor at Green River Community College in Auburn, Wash., brought several court reporting students to lead mock depositions during the Essential Lawyering Skills course at the Seattle University Law School. The mock depositions included swearing in the deponent and handling exhibits.

Rapozo presented the Legal Education seminar Making the Record to the law students using the booklet provided by the National Court Reporters Foundation.

NCRA member Ron Cook, RDR, CRR, CRC, a freelancer in Seattle, also provided a realtime demonstration for the law students.

Read more.








Law Day, May 1, celebrates 50th anniversary of Miranda v. Arizona

Photo by: DES Daughter

Each year, hundreds of law professionals celebrate Law Day on May 1, and 2016 is no exception. In celebration of the 50th anniversary of one of the nation’s best-known U.S. Supreme Court cases, Miranda v. Arizona, this year’s Law Day theme is Miranda: More than words. To help mark the event, the American Bar Association has a number of ideas and resources available on its website to help those interested in celebrating the day within their own communities.

This year’s theme is intended to help those who celebrate Law Day to explore the procedural protections afforded to all citizens by the U.S. Constitution, how these rights are safeguarded by the courts, and why the preservation of these principles is essential to the nation’s liberty.

Activities marking the day, which was first designated in 1958 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, will range from luncheons to mock trials to courthouse tours throughout the nation. The activities will strive to celebrate the country’s legal system and provide consumers with a greater awareness of how today’s courts operate.

NCRA has a number of resources available to assist members with celebrating Law Day, including the materials available as part of NCRF’s Legal Education Program. Other resources to help promote the court reporting and captioning professions are available through NCRA’s Take Note campaign website. Materials include information geared toward potential students and influencers such as parents and school counselors to connect directly with NCRA’s certified and participating court reporting schools and programs.

NCRA members interested in celebrating Law Day are encouraged to contact their local or state bar association to see if they can be part of any planned celebratory events. Other ideas include hosting court reporting demonstrations at local law schools or high schools.

More information about Law Day 2016 and resources to mark the event is available at ABA.org.

Read more about Law Day.








The court reporter’s dilemma: Interrupt or drop

On July 28, a question-and-answer style post on Legal by the Bay, the Bar Association of San Francisco’s blog, written by Ana Fatima Costa, shows why attorneys should not be annoyed when interrupted by the court reporter. “No reporter wants to break the flow and momentarily stop the proceedings, especially during an intense volley of questions and answers and/or colloquy. Yet as officers of the court and guardians of the record, they have a legal and ethical duty to prepare a full, impartial and verbatim transcript of the proceedings,” said Costa.

Read more.








Value of stenographic reporting shines in legal education program

When NCRA member Ronda L. Colby, RPR, CRR, an official court reporter at the Burleigh County Courthouse in Bismarck, N.D., was approached by a presiding judge to speak during Secrets of the Courthouse, a two-hour presentation offered every other year as free Continuing Legal Education to new attorneys, she turned to the Association for resources and discovered NCRF’s Making the Record program.

NCRF’s Legal Education Program, designed to aid court reporters in teaching the value of stenographic reporting and technology to members of the legal profession, has garnered much praise since its launch in 2010.

“I was happy to discover the PowerPoint presentation and I was able to adapt it to fit my needs and cover the hot topics I needed to emphasize,” said Colby, who noted the courthouse program provides all members of the court a chance to describe their roles in the legal system and inform participants of some of the “secrets” they need to know starting out in the profession.

The program, which is free of charge, provides court reporters with an array of tools that can be readily used or adapted to presentation type to help ensure that the legal system understands the benefits of stenographic reporters in the courtroom. Tools include:

  • a presentation outline for the presenter’s use;
  • a PowerPoint presentation about making the record;
  • several handouts with a cover sheet that can be shared with attendees;
  • a presentation evaluation form for attendees to complete to garner feedback about the session; and
  • a script that might be helpful to less experienced presenters.

“I also followed the handouts provided by the Legal Ed Program to gather my thoughts into an outline to reference while speaking to the group. I believe the resources provided a huge benefit to help me organize my thoughts and yet be sure to cover all the bases. I was very thankful to have this resource when I was a bundle of nerves,” she added.

“The Legal Education Program facilitates the education of the legal profession about the role of the court reporter through the court reporter-led seminar Making the Record, and has been used by hundreds of individuals,” said B.J. Shorak, NCRF’s Deputy Executive Director. “The Foundation has also been invited to present this seminar to law schools around the country. It is one of NCRF’s major programs supported by donors.”

According to Colby, approximately 25 attorneys attended the session. Many, she said, asked some general questions and provided stories and anecdotes to help her relate her points to everyday situations in the courtroom.

“I was thankful for the opportunity to share some aggravations and common misconceptions, along with helping guide them to understand the proper procedure while working in the courtroom. I would definitely recommend others use the Legal Education Program when given the opportunity,” Colby said.

For more information about NCRF’s Legal Education Program, please contact B.J. Shorak, NCRF Deputy Executive Director, at 703-584-9026 or bjshorak@ncra.org.








NCRF’s Legal Education Program earns praise

National Court Reporters FoundationNCRF’s Legal Education Program, designed to aid court reporters in teaching the value of stenographic reporting and technology to members of the legal profession, has garnered much praise since its launch in 2010.

“The Legal Education Program facilitates the education of the legal profession about the role of the court reporter through the court reporter-led seminar Making the Record, and has been used by hundreds of individuals,” said B.J. Shorak, NCRF’s Deputy Executive Director. “The Foundation has also been invited to present this seminar to law schools around the county. It is one of NCRF’s major programs supported by donors.”

The program, which is free of charge, provides court reporters with an array of tools that can be readily used or adapted to presentation type to help ensure that the legal system understands the benefits of stenographic reporters in the courtroom. Tools include:

  • a presentation outline for the presenter’s use;
  • a PowerPoint presentation about making the record;
  • several handouts with a cover sheet that can be shared with attendees;
  • a presentation evaluation form for attendees to complete to garner feedback about the session; and
  • a script that might be helpful to less experienced presenters.

When NCRA member Ronda L. Colby, RPR, CRR, an official court reporter at the Burleigh County Courthouse in Bismarck, N.D., was approached by a presiding judge to speak during Secrets of the Courthouse, a two-hour presentation offered every other year as free Continuing Legal Education to new attorneys, she turned to the Association for resources and discovered NCRF’s Making the Record program.

I was happy to discover the PowerPoint presentation and I was able to adapt it to fit my needs and cover the hot topics I needed to emphasize,” said Colby, who noted the courthouse program provides all members of the court a chance to describe their roles in the legal system and inform participants of some of the “secrets” they need to know starting out in the profession.

“I also followed the handouts provided by the Legal Ed Program to gather my thoughts into an outline to reference while speaking to the group. I believe the resources provided a huge benefit to help me organize my thoughts and yet be sure to cover all the bases.  I was very thankful to have this resource when I was a bundle of nerves,” she added.

According to Colby, approximately 25 attorneys attended the session. Many, she said, asked some general questions and provided stories and anecdotes to help her relate her points to everyday situations in the courtroom.

“I was thankful for the opportunity to share some aggravations and common misconceptions, along with helping guide them to understand the proper procedure while working in the courtroom. I would definitely recommend others use the Legal Education Program when given the opportunity,” Colby said.

For more information about NCRF’s Legal Education Program, please contact B.J. Shorak, NCRF Deputy Executive Director, at 703-584-9026 or bjshorak@ncra.org.