Trial presentation tips

JCR logoTips for how to present in wired and non-wired courtrooms were featured in a blog post by David Andre of PlanetDepos. The post was picked up by JC Supra on May 4.

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Advice for lawyers on making court tech work for you

The Court Technology and Trial Presentation Blawg offered advice on how to best make use of court-provided technology in making a case before a jury. Author Ted Brooks noted that some courts insist on lawyers using what the court has, while others permit the lawyers to bring and use their own equipment, stressing the importance of doing research beforehand.

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Trial Presentation certificate program goes online

NCRA’s online Trial Presentation Certificate Program offers the same information that was developed by experts in the field. The program includes a two-step process consisting of reviewing lectures by Tim Piganelli, Diarmuid Truax, Joe Cerda, CLVS, and Steve Crandall, CLVS, followed by a practical assessment of the candidate’s ability to perform the duties of a Trial Presentation Professional. The nine lecture sessions are eight hours total in length and all together have been approved for 0.8 CEU. Candidates who wish to earn the certificate must then pass an exam with 70 percent or better.

As courtrooms adopt new technologies, IT professionals, courtroom personnel, and trial presenters can find a wide range of equipment available in each new situation. Being organized and knowing how to work both old and new systems are the two best strategies.

The Trial Presentation Certificate Program will enable the trial presenter to stay at the top of his or her game by recognizing what to present and how to present it.  Experience in trial presentation and familiarity with trial presentation software is a plus for this program but certainly not a requirement.

To learn more about the Trial Presentation Professional Program, click here.

Today at TechCon: Trial Presentation 101

According to Tim Piganelli, CEO Piganelli & Associates, Phoenix, Ariz., the most effective trial presentations — presentations where a reporter’s transcript and a videographer’s footage come together to create a polished final product — are those that effectively tap into the way jurors learn and retain information. Piganelli, who is recognized as one of the country’s top trial and discovery consultants in the areas of trial strategies, graphics and animation, trial presentation, courtroom technology, eDiscovery, and litigation support, shared his insights about the art of visual advocacy and creating trial presentations that are engaging, concise, and deliver a message, during a session held at NCRA’s TechCon 2014.

According to Piganelli, presenting evidence using technology that generates creative and engaging trial presentations has in part been driven by budget cuts in the courtroom that have resulted in limited time being allotted to some cases. “Trial presentations have decreased the amount of time a case can take from start to finish by 25 percent to 50 percent in some cases. They are a viable way to make the evidence presented in a way that jurors will stay engaged, learn, and retain information more effectively,” he said.

Piganelli told attendees that if they are planning to offer trial presentation services, it is imperative they understand that the general public and lawyers each learn differently, and that it is in the best interest of all parties to be sure litigators recognize that if they are not communicating appropriately to all jurors based on their demographics, then they are not getting to all of them.

Using a series of studies related to the way people learn based on age group and thinking processes, Piganelli pointed out that older jurors would be more likely to gather information by reading newspapers or watching television, for example, while younger generations are more apt to gather the same information through the Internet. Studies of the use of visual advocacy have indicated that using graphics in trial presentations can aid in helping jurors from all age groups to retain more information about the evidence in a case than by just listening to an attorney speak.

Other tips Piganelli offered to help create successful trail presentations included:

  • Know that you will need to cull down the evidence presented in trial and understand that the bottom line is all about jury comprehension.
  • Know that testimony, whether by video or text, is critical to all cases.
  • An effective trial presentation paints a picture and tells a story and does so through charts, timelines, and graphics.

Registration for TECHCON now open

Registration is now open for NCRA’s TechCon 2013 to be held April 19-21 at the DoubleTree Resort by Hilton Paradise Valley in Scottsdale, Ariz. TechCon 2013 will bring cutting-edge seminars on technology together with its three legal programs, the Certified Legal Video Specialist program, the Realtime Systems Administrator program, and the Trial Presentation program. In addition to bringing back the well-received Ignite program, NCRA will be offering new formats for learning at TechCon 2013.

Registration is now open for NCRA’s TechCon 2013 to be held April 19-21 at the DoubleTree Resort by Hilton Paradise Valley in Scottsdale, Ariz. TechCon 2013 will bring cutting-edge seminars on technology together with its three legal programs, the Certified Legal Video Specialist program, the Realtime Systems Administrator program, and the Trial Presentation program. In addition to bringing back the well-received Ignite program, NCRA will be offering new formats for learning at TechCon 2013.

More information about the event, including registration, is online at www.ncra.org/TechCon.