Clark native contributes to new book on court reporting

On Oct. 8, the Suburban News posted an article about Clark County, N.J., native and court reporting student Maria Rose Breien’s contribution to a new book recently released by NCRA. Breien is one of more than 60 working court reporters, CART captioners, and students to have provided input to Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories, a collection of essays and tips about making it through court reporting school.

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NCRA book contributor interviewed by local TV station

Diana Netherton, RPR, an official court reporter from Lancaster, Pa., was interviewed by local television station WGAL about contributing to NCRA’s recently released book Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories. In the interview, which aired Oct. 7, she also talks about what it takes to be a court reporter. Netherton is one of more than 60 working court reporters, CART captioners, and students who contributed to the book, which is a collection of essays and tips about making it through court reporting.

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NCRA’s book showcases court reporters’ humor, passion, and encouragement

CRSG_BookCoverMembers who attended the 2013 NCRA Convention & Expo in Nashville, Tenn., may remember having the opportunity to share their stories of getting through court reporting school. Those stories, from more than 60 working court reporters, captioners, and students, were then organized into a special collection, Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories, which NCRA published earlier this year and is now available in the NCRA store.

“This collection is a true Chicken Soup for the Soul-type book that offers advice and insight from the only people who really understand the ins and outs of court reporting: other court reporters and captioners,” said Jim Cudahy, executive director and CEO of NCRA.

“I felt compelled to contribute my experience to this book to add a little humor and reality to our profession. Court reporting school is stressful and difficult, but having a few laughs along the way makes the experience a bit more bearable,” said Diana Netherton, RPR, an official court reporter from Lancaster, Pa.

This book’s publication coincides with NCRA’s Take Note campaign. The campaign, which launched Sept. 8, is based on an independently commissioned study of the court reporting profession by research firm Ducker Worldwide. The study found that while currently the supply and demand for court reporters is balanced, within the next five years, the need for working court reporters will translate to some 5,500 jobs available in the United States due in large part to today’s working professionals reaching retirement age.

“I contributed to this book as a way to encourage students to ‘hang in there’ during court reporting school, which can be very difficult, because I consider court reporters to play a crucial role in our legal system,” said Marcia Arberman, RPR, a freelance court reporter from Atlanta, Ga.

NCRA has a template press release for every contributor to distribute to the contributor’s hometown media outlets. In addition, NCRA has been posting excerpts from the book on its social media sites. So far, the response has been positive.

The next book in the Court Reporter Survival Guide series will discuss work/life balance, tackling topics like challenges to maintaining balance, finding support both personally and professionally, and how to release stress at the end of the day. Go to NCRA.org/2014book to share your story.

NCRA’s Court Reporter Survival Guide offers inspiration, motivation

CRSG_BookCoverNCRA has released Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories, a collection of essays and tips about making it through court reporting school written by freelancers, officials, CART captioners, and current students.

“This collection is a true Chicken Soup for the Soul-type book that offers advice and insight from the only people who really understand the ins and outs of court reporting: other court reporters and captioners,” said Jim Cudahy, executive director and CEO of NCRA.

“While the stories are written from the point of view of students, the book is designed for all reporters, no matter where they are in their careers. This collection serves as a good reminder to working reporters that despite the sometimes difficult road to earning their place in this unique profession, the ultimate achievement of becoming a ‘keeper of the record’ was worth it,” Cudahy adds.

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