How do you sign new words?

A recent post on the website HopesandFears.com features an article that examines how new Internet-based turns of phrase are entering the sign language community. The article includes an interview with and signing demonstrations by Bill Vicars, the president and owner of Lifeprint, a company that educates through “technology-enhanced delivery of American Sign Language instruction, excursion-based instruction, and extended-immersion-based program coordination.”

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Dutch government to require closed-captioning

According to Telecompaper.com, the Dutch culture ministry plans to impose a requirement for closed captioning and voice-overs on the main public and commercial broadcast channels. In addition, the NPO, the public broadcast organization, is developing an automated sign-language system, which in future will also be part of the mandatory requirements.

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Allegheny County officials to include sign language more often in emergencies

According to a recent article posted by the Pittsburg Tribune-Review, officials in Allegheny County, Pa., relied on sign language interpreter Danielle Filip to help deliver warnings to the deaf and hearing impaired members of the community prior to the sub-zero temperatures the region experienced for two days earlier this month. The article features insights by Filip as well as Joanne Sharer, who served as the county’s first sign language interpreter. Filip appeared as an animated front for Allegheny County’s weather warnings this week, standing with county officials at a Monday news conference before sub-zero temperatures dropped the region into a two-day arctic freeze.

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Denver resident asks for sign-language, closed captioning during emergencies

Following the fires in Denver in June, Monument, Colo., resident Walter Von- Feldt called for increased use of sign language and closed captioning for people with hearing impairments during emergencies, according to a June 18 article in the Denver Post. VonFeldt told the paper that the images on the TV screen left him uncertain whether he should evacuate during the fires.