You got this! You can do it!

Debbie Kriegshauser, FAPR, RMR, CRR, CLVS, CRC

By Debbie Kriegshauser

“You will learn from those challenges. You will attain that speed level. Changing your behaviors, overcoming negative habits, it’s challenging. It’s hard. You have to talk to your inner self and come to the realization that you have to get rid of self-doubt and negative thoughts.”

Debbie Kriegshauser, FAPR, RMR, CRR, CLVS, CRC, Chair of NCRA’s Student/Teacher Committee, and an official reporter in Dallas, Texas, gives students a pep talk.

I recently listened to a motivational speaker through a TED talk that was posted online. What this man had to say was amazing, and I couldn’t say it any better, so I’d like to share a few of his comments when it comes to dealing with the frustrations and setbacks in the speed building universe of court reporting school.

We all need to set goals. What is it that you’re trying to accomplish at the moment? What is the next speed level you need to attain? How will you get there?

You have greatness within you. You have the ability to do more than you can ever begin to imagine. Anybody, through hard work and practice, can perform at a level of excellence, but when you’re doubting your greatness and you don’t know what your limits are, it’s easy to act like you don’t have it within you to succeed. You must believe you have something special. You have greatness within you. You do have the ability to become a great reporter or captioner.

Failure is not an option. You have to say to yourself over and over, “I will fail my way to succeed,” and say it again, “I will fail my way to succeed.” You will fail many speedbuilding tests along your journey, but you also have what it takes to accomplish that goal. Don’t let your mindset play games with you. Begin to believe and feed that belief by listening to other working reporters, going to seminars offered online, and attending reporting conventions. You will walk away with a sense of pride and will be so pumped up and ready to challenge yourself, believe in yourself, ready to stretch yourself to the next speed building level.

Challenge yourself, and make it OK to fail and learn by your failures. Don’t allow the fear of failure to bring you down. Pick yourself up and dust yourself off, and figure out what it is that’s tripping you up and work on that. Practice those tripping hazards over and over until it feels comfortable. Consult with your mentor, if you have one, or seek out a mentor that can get you through the tough times.

Another thing to keep in mind is:  Detoxify your life. There’s a lot of people who never achieve their true goals in life because they’re surrounded with too many toxic, negative, energy-draining people. You’ve got to look at the people in your life and ask yourself:  What is this relationship or friendship doing to me? How is it impacting my life, my learning ability, and my comprehension? Are they an asset to me or a liability? Are they always bringing me down and causing me to have that negative mindset of thoughts of constant failure? Do they elevate my spirits or constantly tear me down?

Hang around people who you can learn from. If you’re the smartest person in the group, find a new group so you can continue to learn from others. There are two types of people: Nourishing people and toxic people. Nourishing people bring the best out of you. They encourage you. They inspire you. They hold you accountable. Toxic people are critical people. They always tell you what you can’t do when they haven’t done it themselves. Don’t let anybody tell you what you can’t do. They don’t know what’s possible for you. Think about some people that you need to bring into your life that you can learn from and that you can grow from.

When you’re uncomfortable and you’re stretching for the higher speed and you’re grabbing that challenge by the collar, you’re going to get thrown to the ground again and again and again. But when you have the determination and know that what you’re doing is right, that gives you energy and drive and empowers you to do your best. You will learn from those challenges. You will attain that speed level. Changing your behaviors, overcoming negative habits, it’s challenging. It’s hard. You have to talk to your inner self and come to the realization that you have to get rid of self-doubt and negative thoughts.

In the trials and tribulations of court reporting school and training to become a court reporter or captioner, you are the star of the show. You are the director. You are writing the script, and you will be the one who will determine whether your ultimate goal in life to be a court reporter or captioner is a smash hit or a flop. You determine that. Working on yourself, talking to yourself, that’s so very important. Overcoming that negative conversation, that inner dialogue that’s going on all the time in your head is vital. You need to stand up to yourself and empower yourself to know that you can really accomplish your goals and dreams. Yes, it’s hard work and effort but hard work and effort will pay off in the end. Your reporting skills will take you places that are literally amazing, and you’ll develop a strong sense of happiness.

Your Oscar award is waiting to be claimed. Just remember: We’ve all been there and we’re all here for you! Use your resources wisely!

Debbie Kriegshauser, FAPR, RMR, CRR, CLVS, CRC, is the Chair of NCRA’s Student/Teacher Committee and an official reporter in Dallas, Texas