Article about court reporting school spotlights captioner for Pittsburgh Pirates

RealClear Politics posted an article on April 16 about Nathan Sibley, York County, Pa., who entered the court reporting program at his local community college. Since graduation, he has earned the job of JumboTron captioner for the Pittsburgh Pirates major league baseball club after interning with the organization.

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SSC announces court reporting open house

The Illinois Patch.com reported on April 9 that the South Suburban College (SSC) is hosting a Court Reporting Open House on May 9 to showcase this unique profession and wide-open job market.

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NCRA A to Z Alumna Profile: From A to Z to RPR in two years

Taylor Lauren Nirschl

Next month, NCRA will have its first known court reporting program graduate who started in an NCRA A to ZTM  Intro to Steno Machine Shorthand program. Taylor Lauren Nirschl from Combined Locks, Wis., will be graduating in May with an Associate Degree in Applied Science in Court Reporting from Lakeshore Technical College, and she will also have another credential behind her name: RPR. Nirschl has some advice for students who are considering taking an A to Z program.

JCR | Is court reporting your first choice of career?

TLN | I would say yes, since my dad has been talking to me about court reporting since seventh grade. My dad works at a workforce development center. I did change my mind a couple of times, but I would always come back to court reporting.

JCR | What attracted you to learn more about it?

TLN | My dad told me how much money court reporters made.  As a seventh grader, that really got my attention. But as I got older, my attraction was more about the technology they use on their job, being in a courtroom, and just thinking about how important their job really is.

JCR | How did you hear about the NCRA A to Z program?

TLN | My parents mentioned that I should go sit with someone to see if this was something I wanted to do. I went back to the school to see if I could get a recommendation on a local court reporter to shadow, and that’s when I met Lori Baldauf.  While I was asking questions about shadowing a court reporter, Lori gave me a flyer about the program.

JCR | What prompted you to sign up for the program?

TLN | I had already signed up for the court reporting program [at Lakeshore Technical College] before I signed up for the A to Z program. I was waiting for school to begin. When Lori shared the information, I decided to sign up.

JCR | What surprised you most about learning steno in the A to Z program?

TLN | How you must learn a whole new alphabet; and the letters are not on the keys. The way you learn how to remember the keys. 

JCR | How soon after completing the A to Z program did you enroll in Lakeshore Technical College?

TLN | I took A to Z in the spring of 2017 and started court reporting school in the summer of 2017. I’m waiting to graduate next month!

JCR | Did you test for any NCRA certifications while in school?

TLN | Yes, I did.  I took the three legs of the RPR certification from October through December 2018 and the Written Knowledge Test in January 2019.  I passed the Written Knowledge Test my first time taking it. When I passed my Lit leg at school, I took the Lit leg of the RPR. It took me two times to pass the Lit leg, but only one time to pass the Jury and Testimony legs. I found testing for the RPR after I passed my legs in school helped me stay on track. I also had an added incentive from my teacher: get my RPR and I’m done with classes.  

JCR | What do you plan to do when you graduate – official, freelancer, broadcast captioner, CART provider?

TLN | I’d like to take a little break since I’ve gone straight through school. However, I would love to work in the court where Lori works, but they don’t have an opening yet. I’ve thought about doing CART.

JCR | What would you say to others considering career choices to encourage them to enroll in the NCRA A to Z program?

TLN | I would definitely encourage anyone interested in court reporting to take the NCRA A to Z program. I think that is what got me through school so fast. It gives you a great head start above everyone else. You already know your letters, so you are able to focus on your short forms and theory. I also think I had more confidence when I started the program and when I attended orientation. When I attended orientation, we got an opportunity to write on the machines. I remembered my letters and easy words like “egg.” I also already knew a few people from participating in NCRA A to Z, which provided me with a ready-made community.

Taylor is currently working toward earning NCRA’s Certified Realtime Captioner (CRC) certification. For more information on the NCRA A to Z program or to learn about the court reporting and captioning professions, visit DiscoverSteno.org.

NCRF scholarships – open to qualifying students at any court reporting program

The National Court Reporters Foundation (NCRF) is now accepting nominations for the Robert H. Clark and Frank Sarli Memorial scholarships for students, as well as applications for the New Professional Reporter Grant. The deadline for all of these awards is June 1. Beginning this year, all NCRF scholarships are open to NCRA student members enrolled in any court reporting program, not just NCRA approved programs. The New Professional Reporter Grant is now open to qualifying graduates of any court reporting program.

The Robert H. Clark and Frank Sarli Memorial scholarships are awarded to high-achieving students nearing the end of their court reporting program who meet a number of criteria, including current student membership in NCRA, having passed at least one Q&A test at a minimum of 200 wpm, and a GPA of at least 3.5 based on a 4.0 standard.

 “This [scholarship] has given me an extra boost of motivation and confidence I needed while I head into my final semester,” said Megan Baeten upon receiving the Frank Sarli Memorial Scholarship in 2018. “It will help me with the cost of schooling for this last semester without the added stress of how I will pay for it. It will also help me with some of the start-up expenses upon graduating, as well as the certification fees.”

The New Professional Reporter Grant is given to a promising working reporter in his/her first year out of school who meets a number of criteria, including current NCRA membership, a graduating GPA of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 standard, and a recommendation from the person’s current employer.

Students looking for scholarships can also consider the CASE scholarships and NCRA A to Z ™ scholarships. Deadlines for these two scholarships, which are also supported by funds from NCRF, have been extended to April 19.

More scholarships and other NCRF programs can be found by visiting NCRA.org/NCRF.

Annual scholarship to benefit students of judicial program

Twin Cities.com reported on Feb. 24 that Benchmark Reporting Agency, based in Minneapolis, Minn., has partnered with Anoka Technical College on an annual $1,000 scholarship.

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NCRA proclamation contest and NCSA Challenge winners announced

Lisa Wagner

Congratulations to the Arizona Court Reporters Association (ACRA) on winning the NCRA 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week proclamation drawing. ACRA President Kate Roundy, RPR, a freelance court reporter from Phoenix, Ariz., submitted the proclamation signed by Gov. Douglas A. Ducey.

This was the first year NCRA has offered the chance for state associations to enter a drawing for a free national Convention & Expo registration. A total of 16 states submitted proclamations.

“Arizona participates every year in NCRA’s Court Reporting & Captioning Week because, heck, we deserve the recognition, don’t we! We are a proud state that believes wholeheartedly that promoting our profession and recruiting for the future is our #1 priority,” Roundy said. “It’s important that we continue to educate our country of our vital role in the integrity of our judicial system as well as our essential role in providing captioning to the public.”

NCRA member Lisa Wagner, RPR, an official court reporter from Highlands Ranch, Colo., won the grand prize of a free NCRA Convention & Expo registration sponsored by the National Committee of State Associations (NCSA). Wagner delivered 11 presentations promoting the profession during the NCSA Challenge that kicked off at the 2018 NCRA Convention & Expo in New Orleans, La., and ended with the last day of 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week held Feb. 9-16.

“I think it’s so important to participate in not only Court Reporting & Captioning Week but also other events such as career fairs and presentations to help promote the court reporting and captioning profession,” said Wagner.

“We really have a unique skill, and students are truly amazed and excited to see realtime or to touch and write on a steno machine. I asked a group of eighth grade girls what they thought a court reporter did. One girl answered hesitantly wasn’t it some kind of code. When I told her that she was exactly right, that it is a code or shorthand, she had a wonderful look on her face and said, ‘I never get anything right!’ That young lady will remember court reporting. That’s why I do this, to see the looks on their faces,” she added. 

First prize in the NCSA Challenge went to Kristen Wurgler, RPR, a CART captioner from Cottage Grove, Wis., who participated in six events promoting the profession including educating co-workers about the benefits of CART captioning.

“Honestly, National Court Reporting & Captioning Week is one of my favorite celebrations of the year. It’s my privilege to work as a CART provider at the University of Wisconsin-Madison,” Wurgler said.

“My colleagues at the McBurney Disability Resource Center are disability accommodation specialists who potentially will be recommending a CART accommodation for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. They need to be familiar with how CART works, the challenges of it, and the environments in which CART can be beneficial (remote or in the classroom).  I believe every member in a team needs to be celebrated so that we can encourage and support not only each other but, as a CART provider, the students we serve as well,” she added.

NCRA’s 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week was celebrated by state associations, members, students, schools, and vendors in a variety of ways that showcased the profession and the skills needed to learn and write on a steno machine. Several-last minute activities adding to the long list of how people celebrated the week are listed below.

NCRA member Patti Ziegler, CRI, CPE, court reporting program chair at the Des Moines Area Community College was featured in a segment about court reporting that aired on WeareIOWA.com about the court reporting and captioning professions.

Watch the segment.

Madison College

The Madison College in Madison, Wis., court reporting program produced a video for YouTube about court reporting and captioning careers that features Jane Kohlwey, a current student and attorney. The school also hosted an information table on campus to showcase the professions.

Watch it here.

Plaza College in Queens, N.Y., produced a radio announcement to celebrate Court Reporting & Captioning Week that was aired on AM970 during the Joe Piscopo show. The school also hosted reporters from local newspapers and participated in the NCRA Student Speed Contest.

Students at Ohio’s Cuyahoga Community College’s (Tri-C) court reporting and captioning program also held a number of events in honor of Court Reporting & Captioning Week.

Ohio’s Cuyahoga Community College

In addition to an annual write-a-thon and bake sale in the school’s Galleria, the students obtained sponsor funds from professionals, friends, and family to write on their steno machines for four hours. While writing, they mirrored the Birdbox Challenge, by putting a blindfold on to prevent them from watching their screen. 

Other activities included a professional pop-up sponsored by the Court Reporting and Captioning Club that afforded students the opportunity to see live demonstrations and chat with professionals, and a mock deposition was held that featured Timothy Peters, a Tri-C graduate and official court reporter in the role of the court reporter. In addition, Tri-C’s associate dean, Dr. James Ploskonka, acted as one of the attorneys, while full-time faculty member Dr. Jen Krueger served as the opposing counsel. Finally, a real detective from the city of Cleveland’s police department served as the witness.


Ohio’s Cuyahoga Community College

Students were also treated to a remote demonstration of CART and caption by Tri-C graduate Deana Kohn via WebEx, during which she captioned a wide variety of events from game shows to live news broadcasts. 

Read more about NCRA’s 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week.

2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week celebrated big across the nation

NCRA members gear up for 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week

2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week is happening nationwide

2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week celebrated in the media and on social media

Thanks again to everyone who participated in 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week and who made this seventh year of celebration a great success! Mark your calendars now for 2020 Court Reporting & Captioning Week happening Feb. 8-15.

Remember, even though 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week is over, you don’t need to stop showing your pride in being a court reporter or captioner. Keep up your activities to promote the profession year-round. NCRA has a number of resources to help members promote the profession throughout the year. Below are just a few:

NCRA’s Press Center

NCRA’s Information Center

NCRA’s Court Reporting & Captioning Week Page

NCRA DiscoverSteno

Contact pr@ncra.org for more information about what’s available.

2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week celebrated big across the nation

Jane Kohlwey helps spread the word at Madison College during Court Reporting & Captioning Week.

NCRA’s seventh consecutive Court Reporting & Captioning Week event was celebrated across the nation by state associations, individual members, students, and firms, via an array of events ranging from open houses to contests to time spent with lawmakers.

At the national level, U.S. Rep. John Shimkus from Illinois recognized the week in a written speech submitted for the official record of the U.S. House of Representatives. In addition, U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis from Illinois delivered a similar speech from the House floor on Feb. 14, recognizing the event.

Members of the Texas Court Reporters Association were at the Capitol on Tuesday, Feb. 12.

Official proclamations for the week were also issued in 16 states including: Arizona, California, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin. Official proclamations were also issued in Eugene, Ore., and Bexar County, Texas.

All states that submitted an official proclamation will be entered into a drawing by NCRA to win one free 2019 Convention & Expo registration. In addition, states that entered the annual NCSA State Challenge, a friendly contest among state associations and individual NCRA members to spread the word about the benefits of a career in court reporting or captioning, will be entered into a drawing for a variety of prizes ranging from complimentary NCRA event registrations to vouchers for continuing education. The winners of both contests will be announced in the Feb. 26 issue of the JCR Weekly.

NCRA President Sue A. Terry, FAPR, RPR, CRR, CRC, a freelance court reporter from Springfield, Ohio, celebrated the event by participating in “Spread the Word,” an online event hosted by the College of Court Reporting in Valparaiso, Ind. Terry joined other representatives from the court reporting and captioning professions to talk to students firsthand about the benefits of a career in court reporting or captioning and to provide motivation and inspiration to those who attended.

Other schools that marked the event with special activities included Anoka Technical College in Anoka, Minn.; Green River College in Auburn, Wash.; the Captioning and Court Reporting program at Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C), Cuyahoga, Ohio; Madison College, Madison, Wis.; and Plaza College, Queens, N.Y.

A number of state court reporter associations reported activities such as get-togethers for members, attorneys, and judges, as well as courthouse displays, contests, social media campaigns, and more.

In honor of the week, NCRA also released several videos of members promoting the court reporting and captioning professions by sharing what they love about their careers. The first five of the series are available at NCRA’s YouTube Channel. Members and state associations are encouraged to share the videos on social media sites as well as use them to promote the profession at career days and other events where the skills of court reporters and captioners are showcased.

See the media generated by the 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week

National Court Reporting Week recognizes the fastest fingers in New York

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Queens court reporting students compete for speed and accuracy in contest to prepare for jobs

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Help wanted: As court reporters age, craft seeks new blood

 (Subscription required)

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National Court Reporting & Captioning Week Showcased on Local Station

Watch the story.

Court Reporting & Captioning Week in Iowa

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Local court reporters recognized

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An Interview with Kaylee Lachmann, RPR

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Planet Depos Celebrates NCRA’s 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week

Read more.

See how others celebrated NCRA’s 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week.

NCRA members gear up for 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week

2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week is happening nationwide

2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week celebrated in the media and on social media

Thanks to everyone who participated in 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week and making this seventh year of celebration a great success! Mark your calendars now for 2020 Court Reporting & Captioning Week happening Feb. 8-15.

Even though 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week is coming to an end, you don’t need to stop showing your pride in being a court reporter or captioner. Keep up your activities to promote the professions year-round. NCRA has a number of resources to help members promote the profession throughout the year. Below are just a few:

NCRA’s Press Center

NCRA’s Information Center

NCRA’s Court Reporting & Captioning Week Page

NCRA DiscoverSteno

Contact pr@ncra.org for more information about what’s available.

Queens court reporting students compete for speed and accuracy in contest to prepare for jobs

s4story.com posted an article on Feb. 15 about students from Plaza College in Queens, N.Y., showcasing their court reporting skills as they competed in the 2019 National Court Reporters Association (NCRA) Student Speed Contest.

Read more.

How an “Evil Zombie Vampire Court Reporter from Hell” figures prominently in NCRA’s Court Reporting & Captioning Week

Maxyne Bursky

By Maxyne Bursky

NCRA’s 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week is a great impetus for veteran reporters to head into reporting schools and give both students and newbies a taste of what successful and amazing careers lie ahead of them. As experienced professionals, we have the privilege and advantage (and obligation, I would offer) of being able not only to show them a living, breathing sample of what’s possible, but also to give them a leg up on the mistakes, errors, or omissions (yes, omissions) we have made and bring this whole industry into perspective for a new generation of verbatim reporters. We are the face of the past and present, and they are our future.

On Feb. 9, I, along with my husband, Richard, a reporter of nearly 45 years, was honored to present a film I wrote and produced called “Evil Zombie Vampire Court Reporter from Hell” to students at Brown College of Court Reporting in Atlanta, Ga. The film is a 43-minute spoof of a deposition in which the star commits 47 professional infractions, any one of which could have gotten her dismissed from her job and many of which could have potentially ended her career.

Just to give you a little taste, the court reporter is 15 minutes late to the deposition, and she offers no apology or excuse. In fact, within the first five minutes, her actions clearly point to the fact that the attorneys in the film are in for a very, very long day.

Every time over the past five years that I have presented this film — as well as its sequel, “Evil Zombie Vampire Lawyer from Hell” — I watch it from beginning to end along with the attendees. I never tire of hearing students and veteran reporters alike gasp and giggle at the evil reporter’s bad behavior. It heartens me to know that the principles of preparedness, professionalism, and propriety, not to mention common sense, are ingrained in the majority of court reporters.

Even so, there are those who have come up to me at the conclusion of my lecture at a reporting school or even at a state convention and complained that the film is misguided in that, for example, not being prepared with exhibit stickers, extension cords, and the like is not so bad, or showing up 15 minutes before the start of a proceeding is acceptable. I typically arrive 45 minutes to an hour early, and when a student is shadowing me, I require them to meet me 60 minutes before the scheduled time so that we can chat about what is going to transpire once we are on the record.  My usual response to these naysayers is, “Well, you keep doing that, and next time those clients will call me, not you.”

Each person who watches the film receives a list of those 47 sins that evil reporter has committed, and I encourage everyone to hold off looking at the list and write on a separate piece of paper the number of bad behaviors they observed and then compare that list to the distributed material. I am so pleased to say, when we got to the lecture portion of the session at Brown College, the students were able to volunteer more than half of the unprofessional antics demonstrated in the film.

Brown College requires my book Talk to the Hands, a practical guide for the newbie, to be used by students in their career development class, which is one of the courses offered just prior to graduation. At each film presentation, I supply a workbook for that book, along with exemplars of cover, appearance, and certificate pages, among others, for students to use as a template when first entering into the court reporting workforce.

As a proud participant in NCRA’s online mentoring program, before I get off the phone with a dedicated court reporting student who’s stuck at 150 wpm or who has just emerged from theory and is feeling overwhelmed, I make sure that they know I went through the same angst, managed to get through it, and love (nearly) every minute of my workday.  And the paychecks aren’t bad either!

Because our profession has expanded so rapidly through technology, one of my mantras at every “evil” film presentation, on every mentoring phone call, at every meet and greet for new students, is realtime, realtime, realtime. That skill is what separates the proverbial men from the boys and expands our opportunities for personal and professional growth. In fact, the “evil reporter” is vehement in refusing to provide realtime to the movie’s attorneys.  In my early days of doing realtime, I felt as if I were sitting in the conference room in my dirty pajamas, and everyone present could plainly see how incompetent I was because of a misstroke here and there. I’m not afraid to share this and other similar observations with newbies, to let them know that with time and experience and a commitment to attaining higher speed through practice even after graduation, these insecurities will fade and be replaced with a satisfaction and acknowledgement of one’s own competence that will give rise to that new generation of professional court reporters.

Maxyne Bursky, RPR, CRR, CRC, is a freelance court reporter from McDonough, Ga. She can be reached at bullymax1@aol.com.

2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week is happening nationwide

NCRA’s weeklong National Court Reporting & Captioning Week kicked off Feb. 9 with state associations, schools, and firms sharing how they are celebrating the week. This is the seventh year NCRA has hosted the event designed to help promote the court reporting and captioning professions to the public by hosting demonstrations, open houses, and more.

At the national level, U.S. Rep. John Shimkus from Illinois recognized the week in a written speech submitted to the U.S. House of Representatives’ official record. In addition, U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis from Iowa is expected to deliver a similar speech from the House floor later in the week recognizing the event.

Arizona

Official proclamations have also been secured in the following states:

Arizona

California

Idaho

Illinois

Iowa

Mississippi

North Carolina

Ohio

Oklahoma

Iowa

Eugene, Ore.

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Wisconsin

What the states are up to

The California Court Reporters Association (CCRA) is hosting several events throughout the week for its members including a “Spread the Love” submission contest via its Facebook and Instagram outlets with a prize of a one-year association membership. CCRA members are also encouraged to share their steno talent at a career fair or volunteer to mentor a court reporting student to mark the week. Throughout the week CCRA will also dedicate one day each of social media posts to highlight members who are official court reporters, captioners, and freelancers. The freelancers’ day will also feature a digital “mixer” via Facebook where freelancers can connect and chat. CCRA is also auctioning off a new ProCat writer on its Facebook page and is hosting a live broadcast about NCRA’s A to ZTM Intro to Steno Machine Shorthand program.

“Court Reporters, the Eighth Wonder of the World,” is a poster the Florida Court Reporters Association has developed for its members to display in their courthouses and offices. The poster provides information about broadcast captioners, CART providers, realtime captioning, and court reporters.


President of the Kansas Court Reporters Association (KCRA) Jennifer Olsen, RPR, CRI, an official court reporter from Topeka, and other association members marked Court Reporting & Captioning Week with a presentation to local county commissioners in Shawnee County in Topeka. KCRA members will also be handing out information and treats all week to attorneys, judges, court staff, administration staff, and building staff in at their courthouse.

In Iowa, members of the Iowa Court Reporters tagged NCRA in one of their Facebook posts, and to date it has reached more than 22,500 people and generated more than 3,500 engagements and 220 shares. In addition, members are posting daily photos of their board members in super hero apparel and encouraging others to share photos of themselves with their machines either with or without super apparel.

President of the Ohio Court Reporters Association (OCRA) Terri Sims, RDR, CRR, an official court reporter from Clinton, Ohio, submitted a letter to the editor to all major newspapers in the state about the important work court reporters and captioners provide. In addition, OCRA members are being invited to participate in a Sip & Paint social event being held on Feb. 17.

In Oklahoma, members of the Oklahoma Court Reporters Association are hosting “A Day at the Capitol” for legislators that will include live demonstrations by court reporters and captioners as well as speakers.

Schools the celebration

Anoka Technical College in Anoka, Minn., is hosting an on-campus Court Reporting & Captioning Exhibition in conjunction with the Minnesota Association of Verbatim Reporters & Captioners. The event will feature demonstrations of state-of-the-art technology, tours of the school’s captioning lab, and short presentations. In addition, industry leaders representing realtime captioners and court reporters will also be on hand for the festivities. There will also be pizza, steno cake, coffee, soda, and prizes.

Faculty from the court reporting and captioning program at Green River College in Auburn, Wash.,  have tasked students with going out into the community and setting up their machines, practicing, and taking photos to try to spread the word about how great a career in court reporting or captioning is. Students will also be armed with information and be posting on social media throughout the week. In addition, one student will be traveling to Italy with her machine and will provide pictures. The photos will then be collected and used for a calendar. To further help students celebrate the week, Byers & Anderson, a court reporting firm in Tacoma, will be hosting a tour of its facilities and host a brunch and a Q & A session with working professionals.

Firms are celebrating too

AB Court Reporting & Video in Denver, Colo., branded a flyer designed by NCRA to help promote the week and the important work that court reporters and captioners do that the firm will share on its social media outlets throughout the week.

For the second consecutive year, Planet Institute, a division of Planet Depos, based in Washington, D.C., is offering three $1,000 scholarship opportunities to qualified students and recent graduates of the nation’s court reporting schools. Those who qualify to apply for one of three $1,000 scholarships are, specifically, students near completion of the program or who completed a court reporting program within the past three months.

And don’t forget the prizes

The NCSA State Challenge is a friendly contest among state associations and individual NCRA members to spread the word about the benefits of a career in court reporting or captioning. The 2019 NCSA State Challenge marks the fifth year the gauntlet has been thrown down. Winners will receive a variety of prizes ranging from complimentary NCRA event registrations to vouchers for continuing education.

This year, NCRA has issued its own challenge as well that calls on all state affiliates to help celebrate this year’s Court Reporting & Captioning Week by securing an official proclamation recognizing the week by their state governor or a state lawmaker. States that submit a copy of their official state proclamation to pr@ncra.org will be entered into a drawing to win one free 2019 Convention & Expo registration.

A downloadable sample proclamation is available on NCRA’s Court Reporting & Captioning resource page.

For additional resources, visit NCRA’s Court Reporting & Captioning Week resources page. No matter how you celebrate 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week, be sure to share your stories and photos with NCRA’s Communications Team at pr@ncra.org.

Read more about what others are doing to celebrate NCRA’s 2019 Court Reporting & Captioning Week.