NCRA member publishes debut romance/murder mystery novel

Incredulity by Kathy ZebertNCRA member Kathy Zebert, RPR, CCR, has a debut romance/murder mystery novel entitled Incredulity. The book is currently available for preorder on Amazon.com in both paperback and Kindle. Hard copies of the book will hit shelves on Oct. 8.

The story follows the budding romance between Callie, an official court reporter in Austin, Texas, and Dominic Jaxson, a local rancher she meets at a nearby restaurant. After several months of dating, Callie finds herself as happy and content as she was before she lost her husband to cancer several years prior, until one morning when reporting the day’s court proceedings, Jaxson is suddenly brought before the judge on murder charges.

While Incredulity is her first published novel, Zebert says she has been writing for many years, including as a contributor to the JCR and various other publications.

“My desire to give the reporting profession a voice in the mainstream media in part motivated me to write this book,” says Zebert, who adds that she plans to continue to write about the characters she has developed in a follow-up that will open with the next chapter of the characters’ relationship. She also notes in the book that she was inspired by her love of many things, including her faith, family, friends, profession, and cowboys.

Zebert, who has been a freelancer and an official court reporter since 1994, notes that she has reported in Mississippi, Tennessee, South Carolina, and Georgia. A past president of the Tennessee Court Reporters Association, Zebert has also presented seminars to both professional court reporters and students and has served as a guest speaker at numerous state court reporter associations, including at the NCRA Convention & Expo, the National Verbatim Reporters Association, and the Mississippi Judicial College Fall Conference.

Zebert is currently a freelance court reporter in Chattanooga, Tenn., and is the owner of Stenedge, a continuing educational resource for legal professionals. She can be contacted at wordsincolorpublishing@gmail.com or at kathyzebert.com.

There’s still time to release the inner writer in you

There’s still time to share with peers colleagues your secrets to balancing everyday life and a career by contributing to NCRA’s latest book currently being compiled. The project marks the second edition in a series of motivational books the Association has plans to produce and will join the Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories, released in September 2014, on shelves across the country.

This latest edition to the series will include not only tips on balancing a personal and a professional life, but also insights into what motivates others, how they release stress, and ways they persevere through tough times and challenges. Contributors can also share tips on where to find support to help maintain stability within their lives.

To date, more than a dozen NCRA members have submitted contributions, including Betty Atanasu, a CART captioner and a coordinator for the Disabled Students’ Program at University of California—Berkeley.

“This career position fits perfectly in my life. It allows me to develop my skills, continually look for new technology, and work with a group of like-minded individuals who have the same goal: to serve our students,” she shared. “Number one is take care of yourself. Make yourself the priority. Second, know your limitations and don’t be afraid to let them be known.”

NCRA member Janice Garrett, an official court reporter from DeSoto, Texas, attributed her motivation in the profession to her need to strive for excellence in every endeavor, including in “trying to attain perfect realtime translation, perfect transcripts, keeping up with technology. That is what we all strive for: to keep the record, balance family and work life, and make it look like it is easy and that we truly are the eighth wonder of the world,” she noted.

Official court reporter and NCRA member Susan Horak, RDR, CRR, from Columbus, Ohio, wrote that she relies on family and friends for support to help maintain balance in her life. “Even though my family lives in other states, they have many of the same issues in their careers: difficult people, deadlines, budget cuts. They let me vent my frustrations, offer advice if they found a solution, and give me an outlet and distraction.”

To share your ideas, thoughts, tips, and insights in NCRA’s next book, go to NCRA.org and complete the questionnaire. But hurry, time is running out to be included.

Release the inner writer in you

Release the inner writer in you by sharing with peers and colleagues your secrets to balancing everyday life and a career by contributing to NCRA’s latest book currently being compiled. The project marks the second edition in a series of motivational books the Association has plans to produce and will join the Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories, released in September 2014, on shelves across the country.

This latest edition to the series will include not only tips on balancing a personal and a professional life, but also insights into what motivates others, how they release stress, and ways they persevere through tough times and challenges. Contributors can also share tips on where to find support to help maintain stability within their lives.

To date, more than a dozen NCRA members have submitted contributions including Betty Atanasu, a CART captioner and a coordinator for the disabled students program at University of California at Berkeley.

“This career position fits perfectly in my life. It allows me to develop my skills and continually look for new technology and work with a group of like-minded individuals who have the same goal — to serve our students,” she says. “Number one is take care of yourself. Make yourself the priority. Second, know your limitations and don’t be afraid to let them be known.”

NCRA member Janice Garrett, an official court reporter from DeSoto, Texas, attributed her motivation in the profession to her need to strive for excellence in every endeavor, including in “trying to attain perfect realtime translation, perfect transcripts, keeping up with technology. That is what we all strive for: to keep the record, balance family and work life, and make it look like it is easy and that we truly are the eighth wonder of the world,” she says.

Official court reporter and NCRA member Susan Horak, RDR, CRR, from Columbus, Ohio, wrote that she relies on family and friends for support to help maintain balance in her life. “Even though my family lives in other states, they have many of the same issues in their careers: difficult people, deadlines, budget cuts. They let me vent my frustrations, offer advice if they found a solution, and give me an outlet and distraction.”

To share your ideas, thoughts, tips, and insights in NCRA’s next book, go to NCRA.org/2014Book and complete the questionnaire.

NCRA’s Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories, a collection of essays and tips about making it through court reporting school, is written by freelancers, officials, CART captioners, and current students. The true Chicken Soup for the Soul-type book offers advice and insight from the only people who really understand the ins and outs of court reporting: other court reporters and captioners. The Survival Guide includes essays and words of wisdom from more than 60 contributors, and features the eight chapters: Superheroes in Training; The Road Less Taken; Motivation; Learning to Juggle; Lean on Me; Practice, Practice, Practice; Testing Our Limits; and A Few Extra Briefs, and it is filled with rich content direct from the trenches. Insight and advice range from small snippets to essays that recalled the inspiration offered by friends, family, and mentors, as well as coping with the anxiety created by drills, tests, and hours of practice each day. The book also contains numerous testaments from contributors sharing the many benefits, rewards, and opportunities court reporting has offered them.

The Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories is available for purchase from NCRA’s online store.

NCRA member’s self-published novel raises some eyebrows

Through Becky’s Eyes, a self-published novel by NCRA member and former official court reporter Helana E. Kline, RMR, CRR, from Middleboro, Mass., that takes place inside Boston’s John Joseph Moakley Federal Courthouse, has raised some eyebrows, according to an article posted Jan. 15 on boston.com.  According to Kline, characters in the book and some of the story line are based on her own experience serving as court reporter at the courthouse, which has been the venue for the Whitey Bulger trial and is currently the site of the jury selection for the case against the accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. The novel is described on Amazon.com as “sexually explicit” and for “mature audiences only.”

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NCRA member publishes first romance novel

Nine Days in Greece, the first romance novel authored by NCRA member Kristie Dickinson, RPR, recently debuted on Amazon.com in e-book format. The story follows Katie Collins, an over-40 woman who sits next to an attractive young man on a flight from Athens to Crete. According to Dickinson, she was motivated to write Nine Days in Greece after traveling to Greece herself. She is currently working on a sequel to the book.

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Clark native contributes to new book on court reporting

On Oct. 8, the Suburban News posted an article about Clark County, N.J., native and court reporting student Maria Rose Breien’s contribution to a new book recently released by NCRA. Breien is one of more than 60 working court reporters, CART captioners, and students to have provided input to Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories, a collection of essays and tips about making it through court reporting school.

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NCRA book contributor interviewed by local TV station

Diana Netherton, RPR, an official court reporter from Lancaster, Pa., was interviewed by local television station WGAL about contributing to NCRA’s recently released book Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories. In the interview, which aired Oct. 7, she also talks about what it takes to be a court reporter. Netherton is one of more than 60 working court reporters, CART captioners, and students who contributed to the book, which is a collection of essays and tips about making it through court reporting.

Read more and watch the video.

NCRA’s book showcases court reporters’ humor, passion, and encouragement

CRSG_BookCoverMembers who attended the 2013 NCRA Convention & Expo in Nashville, Tenn., may remember having the opportunity to share their stories of getting through court reporting school. Those stories, from more than 60 working court reporters, captioners, and students, were then organized into a special collection, Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories, which NCRA published earlier this year and is now available in the NCRA store.

“This collection is a true Chicken Soup for the Soul-type book that offers advice and insight from the only people who really understand the ins and outs of court reporting: other court reporters and captioners,” said Jim Cudahy, executive director and CEO of NCRA.

“I felt compelled to contribute my experience to this book to add a little humor and reality to our profession. Court reporting school is stressful and difficult, but having a few laughs along the way makes the experience a bit more bearable,” said Diana Netherton, RPR, an official court reporter from Lancaster, Pa.

This book’s publication coincides with NCRA’s Take Note campaign. The campaign, which launched Sept. 8, is based on an independently commissioned study of the court reporting profession by research firm Ducker Worldwide. The study found that while currently the supply and demand for court reporters is balanced, within the next five years, the need for working court reporters will translate to some 5,500 jobs available in the United States due in large part to today’s working professionals reaching retirement age.

“I contributed to this book as a way to encourage students to ‘hang in there’ during court reporting school, which can be very difficult, because I consider court reporters to play a crucial role in our legal system,” said Marcia Arberman, RPR, a freelance court reporter from Atlanta, Ga.

NCRA has a template press release for every contributor to distribute to the contributor’s hometown media outlets. In addition, NCRA has been posting excerpts from the book on its social media sites. So far, the response has been positive.

The next book in the Court Reporter Survival Guide series will discuss work/life balance, tackling topics like challenges to maintaining balance, finding support both personally and professionally, and how to release stress at the end of the day. Go to NCRA.org/2014book to share your story.

NCRA’s Court Reporter Survival Guide offers inspiration, motivation

CRSG_BookCoverNCRA has released Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories, a collection of essays and tips about making it through court reporting school written by freelancers, officials, CART captioners, and current students.

“This collection is a true Chicken Soup for the Soul-type book that offers advice and insight from the only people who really understand the ins and outs of court reporting: other court reporters and captioners,” said Jim Cudahy, executive director and CEO of NCRA.

“While the stories are written from the point of view of students, the book is designed for all reporters, no matter where they are in their careers. This collection serves as a good reminder to working reporters that despite the sometimes difficult road to earning their place in this unique profession, the ultimate achievement of becoming a ‘keeper of the record’ was worth it,” Cudahy adds.

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NCRA member authors piece for RID member publication

Jennifer Schuck, RDR, CRR, CBC, CCP, Scottsdale, Ariz., co-chair of the association’s CART Ethics Committee, wrote article about working alongside a CART captioner that appeared in the winter issue of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Inc., (RID) membership publication. The article provides an overview of the services a CART captioner offers, as well as a description of the provider’s equipment, what interpreters can expect when working with a provider, and ethical considerations when dealing with clients. RID is a national membership organization that advocates for excellence in the delivery of interpretation and transliteration services between people who use sign language and people who use spoken language.

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